Pattern Launch – Wrap Me Up Cardigan

Wrap Me Up Cardigan

I have to admit that I am very excited to be launching the Wrap Me Up Cardigan pattern, it has been years since I had the time to develop and design a larger garment, not to mention finding the time to write, test and tech edit such a huge project. And let me tell you – the Wrap Me Up Cardigan is humongous!

Wrap Me Up Cardigan

Basically it is the cardigan I always wanted for myself – one to cuddle up in on the sofa on a chilled evening with my knitting at hand, still so stylish you want to be seen about town wearing it. The Wrap Me Up is oversized, still the texture of the super-squishy brioche and the weight of the softest Alpaca gives it a drape that will hug your shapes making it super comfy and flattering to wear, like a big blankety embrace!

Wrap Me Up Cardigan

The yarn used is Hexa by Du Store Alpakka. This is a yarn that lies extra close to my heart, not only because it is absolutely gorgeous and super-soft, but also because by using it you are supporting local communities in Peru through the Mirasol Project. Peru’s heritage and culture of textile artistry is rich and ancient. The Du Store Alpakka yarns are made from the animals tended by these communities for generations in the Peruvian highlands. A portion of every purchase goes directly to the funding of a boarding centre and school in the remote area of Munani in the region of Puno.

Wrap Me Up Cardigan

Hexa is super-soft and thick, still as airy and lightweight as feathers. Almost like witchcraft, hence it’s name, however it is modern technology that has made this combination of thickness and light weight possible. The yarn is constructed from a single strand of twisted fibres that are knit into an I-cord tube. The finished yarn is, in fact, a knitted tube.

Wrap Me Up Cardigan

We are making the Wrap Me Up Cardigan pattern available at some time tomorrow Friday January 19th, as yarn kits – basically when you buy the yarn needed for the cardigan you will receive a printed copy of the pattern for free. The pattern will also be released as a single pattern Thursday February 1st.

What George Knits – Speedy Knits for Speedy Gifts

socks01Now that the madness of Christmas is over, I can reflect on one of my favourite Gift Knits this year. Socks! Not 4ply ones (I wasn’t that well prepared) but wonderfully quick and fun Double Knit ones.

This year me and my boyfriend spent Christmas at our friends house. Being grateful guests and because it was the season of giving, they all got presents. I’m sure I can speak for many knitters that we reach for our needles and cast on when it comes to present giving. Not only do we get the enjoyment out of making the thing, it is nice to give someone something unique and hand crafted.

Socks have become something of a revelation to me, I have only ever knitted one other pair before these. I would highly recommend anyone who hasn’t knitted a sock to give it a go, they aren’t that scary. My recommendations would be to start with a DK/Worsted pattern. Its quick, the needles are larger, everything is done with that little bit more ease. They also make great warm boot socks, or just lounging about at home on the sofa with a cup of tea socks. For these ones I used a great free pattern called Rye by Tin Can Knits. Another pattern I haven’t tried but looks fun is Bob, designed by Rachel Coopy for the release of her DK sock yarn, its also free, so you have no excuse! But do ask us when you are next in store for pattern advice, we can help with pattern support or provide 1 to 1 lessons to help get you started.

Next the yarn! I know some people find it hard choosing yarn to knit for other people, but I like to imagine their personality and go from there. Hence I have here a bright kooky pair and a more sophisticated classy pair to match our friends characters.

In terms of DK weight yarns suitable for socks, we have a bunch at Knit with attitude. A sock needs a bit of strength and also ideally needs to be easy to wash. Two great yarns I used were: CoopKnits Socks Yeah! DK which is a tough Superwash Merino and Nylon blend and comes in 10 shades. These little 50g balls are perfect for adding fun touches to the heel, toe and cuff. Another good yarn is Fyberspates Vivacious DK a super soft 100g Superwash Merino. We have just expanded our colour range of this yarn to include some fun new shades. I must admit I am tempted to knit another pair for myself in one of the new greens.


This pair was knit with Fyberspates Vivacious DK in Sunshine for the main colour and the counter colour was Coop Knits Socks Yeah! DK in Anemoi.


This pair was knit all in Coop Knits Socks Yeah! DK, using Dionysus for the main colour and Tartarus for the counter colour.

So what are you waiting for, cast on a sock! They make fun gifts. They are easy to transport and make great travel projects, I knit most of mine on the commute! They have interesting construction and shaping. The main thing is they are a lot easier than you might expect.


Christmas Wish Lists – Jess

With Christmas just around the corner we take a look at Jess’s top picks from Of Cabbages and Kings and Knit With Attitude. Jess is the owner Of Cabbages and Kings, a print, homewares and jewellery shop that shares our Stoke Newington HQ.

This year we have all made two lists, one we would like to receive and one we would like to give.

Jess's Wish List

Jess’ Wish List:
New in store is this How to be a Craftivist book by Sarah Corbett and what better way to pass the time on cosy holiday evenings then with a good read.
Everyone needs a bit of glam at Christmas and these Dot Hoop Studs provide a festive flash, with brass details guaranteed to add something special to any outfit.
Always useful to have around and you always need more. These Cocoknits Stitch Markers are a bright and fun way to keep track of your knitting.
Who can resist the lure of Hedgehog Fibres. The hand dyed squishiness of their Merino DK is to die for.
Of Cabbages and Kings range of Stuart Gardiner Oven Gloves are perfect for wrestling that Christmas Turkey out of the oven.

Jess’ Give List:
Want to give a perfect gift to a knitting friend or relative then try Woods by Verena Cohrs and Hannah Lisa Haferkamp. Full of interesting articles and even more interesting knits.
Know any cyclists? Or anyone going on a trip in the new year a great way for them to keep notes is this Road Bike Jounal.
Need a gift for a stylish friend then choose these Eco Friendly Silver Necklaces by Wild Fawn. Elegant and Ethical, the perfect combination.
Jess has been knitting socks this year for a few Christmas Gifts and what speedier way than in the lovely Vivacious DK. A quick and thoughtful present.

Jess' Give List

Christmas Wish Lists – Sanna

Festive feelings are high in Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages and Kings and we are looking at what Christmas Gifts we want to give and receive this year.

Third up on our series of staff inspired wish lists is Sanna. Working with both shops at the weekend Sanna’s list is inspired by things that catches her eye in both Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages and Kings. This year we have all made two lists, one we would like to receive and one we would like to give.

Sanna's Wish List

Sanna’s Wish List: 
A whole bunch of Hexa. Who could resist its snuggly warmth in the winter months. Also it comes in a fun range of brights and neutrals.
As everyone knows Sanna is a big crochet fan and also teaches crochet classes at knit with attitude. This Chunky Row 25mm Crochet Hook is a fun edition to any crocheters arsenal.
This Satellite Bowl linocut print by Jane Smith is available in store from Of Cabbages and Kings. Its also part of a wide range of prints by different artists that can be found online at Of Cabbages and Kings.
You can never have enough notebooks right? These Layflat Notebooks by Ola are perfect for jotting down Christmas lists in style.
Christmas and Cocktails, what a perfect combination! This Classic Cocktails Tea Towel is a great edition to your kitchen, get mixing!
Looking for some statement jewellery to wear to the Christmas Party the look no further than the Form Panel Necklace from Tom Pigeon. Great geometric lines bring a pop of glam to any outfit.

Sanna’s Give List:
These fun Bookblock Notebooks have covers designed by independent illustrators and are a perfect gift for the notetaker in your life.
For any fellow knitters, or you just want to inspire another to start a new hobby then Knit With Attitude has plenty of inspiring kits like this Pompom Hat Kit.
For the jewellery fan the check out the range of Jewellery Of Cabbages and Kings have in store and online.
Know any aspiring print makers? Screen Printing – The Ultimate Studio Guide is full of hints and tips to get them going.
Something for your worst enemy maybe, or just a tongue in cheek gift. Then go for a Sardonic Tote to make them laugh this Christmas.

Sanna's Give List

Interview with Jule from
Hey Mama Wolf

In our effort to create a full range of ethical and environmentally sourced yarns, we have spent a long time searching for a company making yarn dyed with plants, or naturally dyed yarn. This is an inherently niche idea, so while there are people out there naturally dying yarn, it was difficult to find someone dying that could also handle the larger scales required to supply orders from yarn shops. We were so excited to meet Jule who came to visit the shop while she was in London attending Pomfest this summer and discover her yarn company, Hey Mama Wolf. Not only does Jule dye all of her yarns naturally, the yarns themselves are also sourced and processed locally to her in Germany, greatly reducing the carbon footprint of the yarn. We have started off with the Sockyarn #04 and kits to do your own natural dying at home.

With all this to consider, we were excited to ask Jule a few questions about Hey Mama Wolf and learn about what goes on behind the scenes.

jule hmwHow long have you been knitting?
When I was about 10 years old we visited my great aunt Agnes and she told me that I needed to learn how to knit. Without further ado she just taught me. I don’t think I had a choice but I enjoyed it very much. First things I knitted were teeny tiny things for my Barbies – scarfs, hats and even mittens. Aunt Agnes was also the one who taught me mending and gave me my first sewing machine.

kupfer mordantWhat inspired you to get into dying and specifically natural dying?
Again I will start with my aunts and my grandma. Aunt Agnes was a garden architect, my grandma has a huge garden and another aunt is a herbalist. My mother often took me for long walks in the woods and the botanical gardens. They all planted the love for plants in me. I was always especially interested in healing plants. I became a textile and surface designer, and when I graduated from art school, I was a freelance knitwear designer. After having our first daughter I started looking for sustainable local yarns. I love natural wool colours very much but what would knitting be without colourful yarns? Two very good friends of mine asked me why don’t I do plant dyeing. I love to explore and I love plants. So these friends were absolutely right. I find great joy in dyeing with plants.

farbkarte birkeWhere and how do you source the dyes that you work with? Can you tell us more about the plant origins?
I started with using only hand gathered plants from walks in Berlin and Brandenburg, leftovers from friends (flowers, onion skins, avocado pits…) and what I got from the local organic market – turmeric, carrot greens, whatever wasn’t suitable for selling anymore. But I knew that I wouldn’t get far with that if HMW wanted to grow. Right now I’m using plant dye extracts that are made by a company nearby in Magdeburg. I was so thrilled when I found out that there is actually a company in Germany who does that. They come as an easy to use powder. The difference between these and chemical dyes is that they are still a natural product and are much more influenced by other parameters – water, weather, mordants, the yarn itself. Every dyer will get different results.

Some colours I prefer to dye with plant matter itself. I try to buy them organically and preferably local grown. I still get stuff from the local market and of course I’m still exploring the colours that surround me, my local dye plants. We live in an old water mill surrounded by nature, so when a tree falls down in a storm I gather the bark and leaves. When tansy and St. John’s Wort are flowering in abundance I will go and gather. Right now I’m very interested in using mushrooms as a dye material. It is a whole different story to plants though, I’ll have to get acquainted to the fungi world.

johannis etsyDo you have a favourite plant to dye with? 
Oh yes, many. The first that comes to my mind is birch bark. It smells so good when you cook it and most of the time it makes the most beautiful dusty pinks or golden browns. Then fresh St. John’s Wort flowers. You can dye at least four different colours with it, bright green, golden yellow, orange and maroon. I also find many oak galls on my walks and I love the greys that I can achieve with them.

birkenrinde topfThe fibre for your yarns are all sourced locally to you in northern Germany, can you tell us more about where they come from and how they are made?
Yes, the wool comes from small organic farms in northern and eastern Germany. The farms sometimes only have some sheep to mow the lawn, while others have as many as 200- 300 sheep to produce cheese and meat. I don’t know many of the farmers personally. The wool mill gathers the wool. They sort and scour it (just with plant based soap) and it is then spun. The natural brown wool is from the Frisian milk sheep of my neighbour Anna. She has about 150 sheep and makes the best cheese. Anna is a very inspiring person. She makes everything from the wool of her sheep. Carpets, woven fabric, mattresses and pillows, wall hangings and of course she spins and knits. It is lovely to stand next to her watching the sheep. She can tell a story of every single one of them.

faerberknoeterichHow do you develop a new colour way? Do you start with a specific combination in mind, or is it a happy accident? 
In the beginning there was exploring and many happy accidents. Now I can predict the outcome much better. Still natural dyes are always surprising. Some weeks ago I dyed a colour that I often dye, a best seller, a golden yellow with St. John’s Wort. I made two batches at the same time, doing everything absolutely exact according to my recipe. One batch was golden yellow, and one was green. A beautiful green and I would love to dye it again, but I don’t have a clue what went wrong. I can’t even blame the stars, because I made them at the same time. As a textile designer I work pretty much according to the books when developing a shade card. I make a mood board, then think about which plant can give me which colour.

muehle herbst 1What’s currently on your needles?
Too much. I have the Whinfell sweater of Jenn Steingass from Woods on my needles with my own hand dyed and hand spun yarns. There are mittens for our children with my Rauwerk wool. I’m working on a striped pullover with my #02 yarn. A pair of socks with the Mistletoe pattern by Verena Cohrs. A vest from my #03 yarn. But my favourite project these days is not knitting related. We’re currently renovating our old house and I’m trying to make plant pigments to use in my own wall paint.

Christmas Wish Lists – George

Festive feelings are high in Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages and Kings and we are looking at what Christmas Gifts we want to give and receive this year.

Second up on our series of staff inspired wish lists is George’s. Working with both shops at the weekend George’s list is inspired by things that catches his eye in both Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages and Kings. This year we have all made two lists, one we would like to receive and one we would like to give.

George's wish list

George’s Wish List:
A Palm Print by Factory Press. George said he has long admired this print by Factory Press’s Liz Loveless and it would go perfectly in his yellow hallway at home.
These Pineapple Pots are not just for Christmas. Their brass geometric design looks good all through the year and perfect for those little cacti and succulents.
This tweedy but oh so soft Alpaca Tweed, a recent edition to the shelves of Knit With Attitude is gorgeous for those winter accessories and quick holiday knits.
There is no better way to dress up a shirt for the chistmas party or any special occasion, than these Gold Beton Cufflinks. A very special gift to find under the tree.
Who can resist more craft accessories and the rustic charm and handy size of these Yarn Snips are a great addition to any project bag.

George’s Give List:
For the Boyfriend – He’s a soft professed wine buff and a perfect way to test his skill with these Pairing Wine With Food Tea Towels.
For the Best Friend – A challenge for the new year is to find unique places to meet for a catch up. With the London Coffee book we will never be short of ideas and
spots to spend long afternoons gossiping.
For the Knitting Friend – I know my knitting friend would never say no to a jumpers worth of yarn. The great value of Lettlopi and its amazing colour range means they will
have great fun working with it.
For the Brother – Last year my brother asked for a black hat. So this year he’s going to get one! Spud & Chloe Sweater is my choice, it should be a quick and simple

George's give list


Christmas Wish Lists – Maya

Festive feelings are high in Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages and Kings and we are beginning to look at what Christmas Gifts we want to give and receive this year.

First up on our series of staff inspired wish lists is Maya’s. Owner of Knit With Attitude, Maya’s list draws on some favourite things from her shop as well as Of Cabbages and Kings who share the same shop space. This year we have all made two lists, one we would like to receive and one we would like to give.

Maya's Wish List

Maya’s Wish List:
A selection of Garnsurr Søkke Merino. This is a new range of yarn for us and its hard to resist, its simply beautiful and is a social integration project for refugee
women in Norway. One to warm your heart and your needles this Christmas.
A Hey Mama Wolf Dying Kit. We’ve been captivated by natural dying here in the shop recently and these kits have really caught peoples imagination.
Read This If You Want To Take Great Photographs of Places. Not only do these make interesting reads they are full of practical tips. Perfect if you have any holiday
travel plans and want to capture the moment.
A sweaters worth of Socks Yeah. Maya says she has been inspired by the Tabular jumper on the cover of Pompom 23 and a perfect yarn for this is Socks Yeah with a gorgeous range of colours its easy to find a great combo.
Bristol Ivy’s book Knitting Outside the Box is a must for cosy inspiring projects guaranteed to keep you entertained over the holidays.

Maya’s Give List:
For the Husband – a whole lot of Picture Hangers so that the pictures that never get framed can get up on the wall.
For the Daughter – Read This If You Want To Take Great Photographs Of People. Living in the snap-chat era this will come in handy.
For the Son – The Red Fox Cub by Tiff Howick because he has seen it in Of Cabbages and Kings and thinks that the fox is soooo cute! – and also a ball of Stitch & Story,
so that he can finally finish his scarf he’s been working on for the last two years.
For the Best Friend – Luna Drop Earrings – they are just super cool!

Maya's Give List

Interview with Ann Helen from Garnsurr

Here at Knit With Attitude we are always on the look out for new and exciting companies to work with. Maya was so excited when she met Ann Helen of Garnsurr at the Oslo Knitting Festival in October and heard about their project to help refugee women integrate into Norwegian culture through language courses, gainful employment and social outreach. Garnsurr is the newest yarn in the shop and we are loving all the new fun and exciting colourways.

We were able to ask founder Ann Helen a few questions about why she started the business, and the inspiration and women that keeps it going. You can find the Garnsurr yarns in our webshop.


Where and how do you source the yarns that you work with?
We buy all our yarn from Chester Wool in the UK and the yarns originate from Peru.

06_nyh_Garnsurr4What does social integration mean, and how have you built your business around it?
Social integration means that we try to help refugees in our area to become a real part of the community. That means in every way – both creative, workwise and social. This also means that we always have to work with the social part of our business, not only the business side. I use quite a lot of my time  helping them handle their personal economy, and other problems they encounter in our society. This comes in addition to the dying job and language training.

How has Garnsurr been received by the wider community in Norway?
We’re quite young in our business life, but have been very well recieved both at Bergen and Oslo Knitting Festivals. The local community is also very supportive,  we get a lot of emails and comments on our project from all over the country. We’re quite overwhelmed by this support.

IMG_20170613_212159_766Can you tell us a about the women that are currently dying with Garnsurr?
We have three women at Garnsurr at the moment working full time. The first one is Akberet, 50 years old from Eritrea. She became a widow earlier this year, and she has five almost grown up children. Three are living in Norway, a daughter in Sweden and a son in Germany. She is the most experienced dyer at Garnsurr at the moment. Second is the single mother Leila, 35 years from Afghanistan. She has four children from 9 to 14 years old. She has a wonderufl devotion for Garnsurr, and her tremendous spirit inspires us all every day. The third lady is called Hawa, 45 years old  from Somalia. She has a real big family, she has given birth to thirteen children, but only eight are alive. She has a special eye for colour, and gives a lot of our colourways a real “african” touch.

Recently we also got another women from Eritrea, who will have language practice with us one or two days a week.

IMG_20170929_105521How do you develop a new colourway with your dyers? Do you start with a specific combination in mind, or is it a happy accident?
The Garn Surr ladies decide most of the colours nowadays. Some days I wish for colours, and they try to make what I dream about. Sometimes we also make “happy accidents” on purpose – just to try out new techniques and ideas that appear in the team. Most of our time goes to turn on the “sold out” signs in our webshop, and make deliveries for our stockists.

2-7What’s currently on your needles?
At the moment, I’m about to finish Cobaltoan hat by Lesley Ann Robinson from Pom Pom magazine 23. The brioche pattern is my first, and I really enjoy it. I’ve sadly made a mistake on one side of the hat, but I close my eyes and forgive myself! I’ve also just finished another hat by Stephen West – Syncopation Adoration which is just waiting for the ends to be woven in. A jacket by Pickles (a very fashionable yarnstore in Oslo which we are collaborating with), “Big Nore” is just waiting for buttons. The very next project on my needles is Comfort fade cardi by Andrea Mowry – I will attend her KAL in December, and all of my earlier projects in November are also parts of our #garnsurrKAL which started the 1st of November and ends on Christmas Eve. As you see – I knit as much as I can!

What George Knits – Knitting with Nature

We have a lovely selection of natural dye products, books and yarn in store at Knit with Attitude and this has inspired some natural dying of my own.

I can’t recommend highly enough the two books we stock on natural dying. These make great go to resources on the magic of nature and the variety of colours at your fingertips. The two books we have are ‘The Modern Natural Dyer’ by Kristine Vejar and ‘Botanical Colour at your Fingertips’ by Rebecca Desnos. Not only are these books so stunningly beautiful, but they present themselves in a easy to follow way. Everyone should have a go!

My first attempt at dying was to dye yarn. I chose an un-dyed merino as my base, but any un-dyed yarn we have in store will work for you. Like the white Knit by Numbers KBN55 or the undyed Purl Alpaca Fine and Medium yarns. It does however help if the yarn is in a skein, as this allows the dye to move around the fibre more easily, resulting in a more even colour. Though turning a ball of yarn into a skein can be done by winding it around the back of a dining chair for example, then tying it in places so it doesn’t tangle, then sliding it off. Also to note as I found out later, different yarns can effect the colour, so I would try all sorts.

I dipped in and out of both books for my first attempt, choosing the scouring and mordanting techniques of Kristine Vejar, I prepared my yarn. With that done I flicked through the Rebecca Desnos book for plant inspiration. Botanical Colour at your Finger tips is more of a guide book, where as with the Modern Natural Dyer you learn through fun little projects. So
depending on the way you learn either could work for you.



For my first dye I decided on using stinging nettles, hoping for a wonderful grassy green. So off I went, armed with some thick gardening gloves and a large plastic bag. I popped to my local woods, where they grow plentifully along the sides of the pathways. I will say as Rebecca Desnos points out, be mindful when foraging, collect weeds and invasive species
first and not in the same area, to not destroy the habitats of the wildlife that live there. Walking around the woods like a madman I collected my nettles and with my bag full and only being stung once, I headed home. With an old pan bought from a charity shop specially for the job, I boiled up my leaves. One thing I will say, boiling nettles does smell very appetising. The whole flat smelt very strongly of nettle tea.



When strained of the plant matter, I was left with a pot of what looked like a pan of overly stewed brown watery tea. Not disheartened I carried on and in went my prepared yarn. The whole process is like alchemy or witchcraft and I left my yarn bubbling away in its nettle broth. When the allotted time was up I pulled it out and guess what it was green! All be it a very pale shade of green. But it was my green, my first naturally dyed yarn. Its a great feeling having created something that is unique to you and unique to your surroundings. Its from the earth, its nature.


As you could well imagine I was excited to knit it up straight away. I chose the Arvia Shawl from Amirisu 13 which champions natural colour and has some interesting articles worth a read.

Intrigued by the dying process and how it might react to different fibres I tried another dye. This time oak galls, which I read historically were used to create inks. So the potential for a dark moody colour really got me excited.

0706Back to the woods I head and like a pig rooting around for truffles, I scour the forest floor for the deformed acorns that are caused by the gall wasp. These boiled up with an intriguing woody smell and the dye pot looked as dark as can be. All good so far. I sieved out the galls and popped in un-dyed merino, a new wool and some mohair and waited for the
results. I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I was expecting a dark brown but got an olive green with subtlety different shades over the different fibres. The Modern Natural Dyer has a project where you make a shawl out of dyed different fibres and you learn through the process. A pattern for me to try in the future I think.


My latest dying attempt and actually what hooked me into The Modern Natural Dyer book, wasn’t a project to dye yarn but to dye fabric. Kristine Vejar takes you through all the steps you need. I chose a natural piece of fabric and prepared it to her instructions. Then went rummaging around my garden for any brightly coloured flowers I could find, luckily I went a
bit overboard with the flower beds this year so there were plenty to choose from. If you don’t have a garden, try a brightly coloured bunch of flowers from the shop. Certain flowers work better than others but its worth a try. I may plant more dye heavy flowers next year as a result of this, like cosmos and marigolds.


Boiling up my flowery bundle and then unravelling my finished fabric was pure joy. Some flowers took and some didn’t but the result was beautiful. Like a watercolour painting or an ink blot test. Definitely one to try again.



If you fancy having a go at dying yourself we also have natural dying kits by Hey Mama Wolf. These have the materials you need to dye fabric or yarn with dried flowers and plants at home. If natural dying doesn’t appeal to you and you love the natural look of plant dyed fibres then try the Hey Mama Wolf sock yarn we stock. They are hand dyed with a dreamy
selection of natural materials. As a result they have a range of colours that are gentle and pleasing to the eye as the natural environment they came from.

What Maya Knits – East or West Pullover

To be honest – the heating in our shop is not ideal for the really cold winter days – especially if you are sat still in the back room with admin all day, but who cares when it is the perfect opportunity to snuggle up in our favourite knit wear? Like today, Natalie in a gorgeous colour work cardigan, George who just finished his Speckle and Pop Mystery KAL in his awesome shawl (I just posted a picture of this over on our Instagram if you’d like to take a look), and me wearing my just finished East or West.

The East or West Pullover is a design by Joji Locatelli from her latest collection with Veera Välimäki Interpretations Volume 4. I really enjoyed working on this project as I happen to be a proper construction geek, and the East or West (as its name suggest) completely changes direction half way through. First you knit the center front and back panels from the shoulders down, then you work from the side of the panels shaping the sides and sleeves of the pullover.

East or West

As I prefer – there’s not much sewing involved – you only have to graft the side seams, which means that the pullover when finished appears seamless, which is another design feature that I really like. The East or West is an interesting knit, still easy enough to do watching your favourite series, which is exactly what I did when starting this project during my summer holidays.

East or West Detail

I am particularly pleased with the yarn choices I did for my project. For the main two colours I chose to use the wool/linen blend Lyonesse by Blacker Yarns it gives such a well defined stitch, it is crisp with a rustic feel due to the qualities of the linen, still lovely to wear next to the skin as the wool gives softness, and warmth too. For my turquoise pop of colour I used some Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles left overs I had from a different project, in the colour Wish.

East or West

Joji and Veera are celebrating the five year anniversary of their collaborations next year and I really can’t wait for the Interpretations Volume 5 to be released from Pompom Press, I know I’ll be hooked so quickly, I just love their designs. BUT – sweater season is definitely upon us and I’m planning my next project, and speaking of which, there is another incredibly exciting publication from Pompom Press being released these days, their first hardback book is just around the corner to be delivered to us. Bristol Ivy has finally gathered all her amazing ideas and talent into this one book – Knitting outside the Box – and I have already picked my favourite and next project. Just look at this sweater, my heart literarily skipped a beat when I noticed the Arbus – I can’t wait to cast on!