Yarn Feature: The Fibre Co. – Meadow

The Fibre Co’s Yarn of the Month for May is Meadow. So what better way to shed some light on this gorgeous yarn, than a Yarn Feature. The Fibre Co are well know for creating interesting fibre blends and Meadow is no exception. A blend of 40% Merino Wool, 25% Baby Llama, 20% Silk, 15% Linen. The Merino and Baby Llama provide softness and bounce, the Silk sheen and drape, and the Linen a crisp hand and lovely stitch definition. Perfection!

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The Fibre Co began in 2003 in an old warehouse on the working waterfront of Portland, Maine, USA. Founded by Daphne Marinopoulos, they began with a small spinning mill, lots of raw natural fibre and a vision of creating yarns that she couldn’t find on the retail shelves. Now based in the UK the Fibre Co have become a global brand, working with a variety of producers and artisans.

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A detail of Fairy Mist by Knitted Bliss.

The Fibre Co describe Meadow as ‘Rustic Luxury’, inspired by the eco system of meadows. How they house local fauna and serve as a fertile growing ground for flora of many varieties. Meadows are usually filled with grasses and other non-woody plants so have a feeling of lightness, which lends itself perfectly to this beautiful lace weight yarn.

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The fibre blend creates and interesting texture and the dying process has given a compelling play of colour throughout the skien. It’s fibrous, but soft and will add a nice heathered texture to your projects. Earthy but sumptuous.

Spun into a 2 ply yarn that’s slightly heavier than a typical lace weight yarn. This blend of fibres creates a versatile yarn able to work on a wide range of projects and over a variety of needle sizes. Made and dyed in Peru, these 100g skeins have 498m / 545yds per skien, with a tension of: 32–36sts over 10cm / 4″ and a recommended needle size of between 2.25cm-3.25mm.

Lets take a look at a few patterns that give justice to this super yarn:

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Summer Meadow by Janina Kallio is a simple easy to knit shawl that will celebrate the yarn, while not complicating it with fussy details. Textured garter stitch is offset with eyelet rows on stocking stitch. The lightness of Meadow will make this the perfect elegant layer.

meadow06Planting Seeds by Helen Stewart is the project for those who can’t decide on one colour. Knit in three skiens of Meadow, bold and graphic but with a lightness from the yarn. Slipped stitches add interest here and create an interesting interplay with the other colours.

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Huia by Libby Jonson is a luxurious, light cardigan with pretty lace details. A go to layer, that is smart, while also being relaxed. No picking up for the bands, the edge detail is worked with the body.

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Fluted by Cecily Glowik MacDonald, is a simple cardigan that showcases this yarn. Worked seamlessly, top down and uncomplicated. The smallest of details are provided by the Art Deco-esque designs on the collar.

I hope this post has inspired you to take a look at this fabulous fibre blend and made you think about giving lace weight knitting a go.

Yarn Pairings for Making No.1 Flora

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How beautiful is our latest arrival? It’s of Making No.1 Flora, the first issue of a brand new magazine from Carrie Bostick Hoge of Madder Made. We could not be more excited here at the shop, and have been cooing and exclaiming over it all morning! This inaugural issue includes contributions from 21 different designers and makers across multiple craft disciplines, including knitting, crochet, sewing, cooking and embroidery.

As always we love to see the knitting patterns, and to pair them up with yarns we have in the shop.

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The first pattern is Branches and Buds, by the editor herself, Carrie Bostick Hoge. The pattern features a modern take on a classic colourwork yoked sweater in two high contrast colours. The little buds are added afterwards, the perfect use of leftover bits of yarn we all have. We would knit the main sweater up in Susan Crawford’s Excelana DK.

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Next up is the Flora Cardi and Cowl, also by Carrie Bostick Hoge. These two patterns use the same lace stitch, along the collar and fronts of the cardigan, and as an allover design for the cowl (or snood as we would say in the UK!). Worked up in different yarn weights it is an interesting way to see the same stitch pattern in different settings. The cardigan would have wonderful drape and be light as a feather in Fyberspates Scruptious Lace, while the snood would have more body with a heavier yarn such as Du Store Alpakka Fin.

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Susan B. Anderson has created a sweet pair of fairy dolls that tuck into little flower beds. A Flower Fairy would be a lovely toy for a wide range of ages. Blacker Swan comes in many colours to knit the flowers and leaves of your choice.

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Marigold is a seamless bottom up cardigan by Cecily Gowick MacDonald. With its shawl collar, 3/4 length sleeves and a lace panel up the back, it is an effortless addition to any summer wardrobe. We have 8 shades of the called for The Fibre Co. Meadow in stock to knit it in.

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Another cardigan is Silver Leaf, by Hannah Fettig. This sweater has full length sleeves, and a deep lace motif on the fronts and collar. This design is a good transitional garment from warm days to chilly evenings, and would fit perfectly in England’s potentially dreary days. Noro’s Tokonatsu is a cotton/silk/viscose blend that would create a perfect summer cardigan to cozy up in without overheating!

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Tulip Fields, by Dawn Catanzaro is a shawlette knit in garter stitch. With laceweight yarn and a deep diamond and zigzag border, an otherwise winter stitch becomes light and airy for summer evenings. We are dreaming of it knit up in Kettle Yarn Co. Beyul.

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The Violet Cap and Bonnet, by Melissa LaBarre is another example of a stitch pattern being used for slightly different pieces. The bonnet is sized for babies and children with a practical tie under the chin to stay on, while the cap is sized for adults. They would both be beautiful in Fyberspates Scruptious 4ply.

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Last but not least is the Wildflowers Cap by Mary Jane Mucklestone. If you have to wear a wooly cap in the summer, it might as well have flowers on it! We would choose two shades of Mondial Bio Lana for ours. And we might need it with the week that London is having at the moment!

There are many more craft projects in this issue to enjoy, we have just highlighted the knitting ones first. How to choose the next project!

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