Yarn Pairings for Laine Magazine Issue 7

One of our favourites here at Knit With Attitude is Laine. With its sumptuous photography and simply gorgeous designs, it’s not only a book of patterns, but something you can pick up for inspiration again and again. With a host of great designers work between its covers, it will have you itching to start that new project. So what’s a new project without the yarn! In this yarn pairings post I have but together some yarn suggestions from the shelves here at Knit With Attitude. So read on and admire the patterns and start dreaming!

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Also for all of you placing your pre-orders before Laine 7‘s release on the 15th February you will get it for the old price of £20 on the 15th it will go up to £22.

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First up we have Apricite by Kiyomi Burgin. A gorgeously warm looking jumper, which is taking on the massive trend of holding a single strand of mohair lace with another yarn. Giving you the tender halo of a mohair with the strength and body of a base yarn. This jumper is worked flat in pieces from the bottom up. A relaxed drop shoulder shape, with a simple lace detail that runs along the front and back and is carried along the sleeves. Understated, but with a few details to keep the knitter interested. A fairly simple knitting project that would please anyone who is daunted by seamless construction. This pattern would look great in a combination of the heathered tones of the Fibre Co. Lore and the lovely floaty Hedgehog Fibres Kid Silk Lace. Plus you get the fun of combining two interesting fibres.

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Next up is Bohus by Carol Feller. This jumper is inspired by Bohus Knitting, a Swedish knitting cooperative active between 1939 and 1969. Designed to be one of those comfy slouchy jumpers you have to be forced out of on cold days. The coloured yoke features an interesting purl detail between colour transitions to create a mirage effect. This pattern calls for John Arbon’s Devonia DK, a rich Devon breed blend, which we have in every colour.

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When you think brioche there are two names that spring to mind, thats why Brioche Buddies by Nancy Marchant and Stephen West is so special. A collaboration by brioche royalty, this pattern features an entertaining mix of zig zagging brioche and garter stitch panels. With two size options, it will make the perfect wintery or spring layer. I would choose two contrasting tones of Vivacious 4ply and Hedgehog Fibre Twist Sock, the slight variegation in this yarn mixed with a contrast speckle would make this pattern come alive.

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Calla by Natasja Hornby is a stunning large triangle shawl. Sequences of broken rib alternate with charted lace and cable sections, this is a project for those who like to get their teeth sunk into heavily structured stitches. For a softness you’re neck deserves choose John Arbon’s Knit by Numbers. One of the softest merinos I have felt, although you may take you some time in choosing from all those colours!

laine05Davvi by Aleks Byrd takes its name from Northern Sámi language and means ‘north’. Inspired by the shapes seen in traditional Sámi clothing and woven belts. The chevron shapes echoing the shapes of trees in the forest and the peaks of mountains. Knit in three contrasting colours and featuring an intriguing combination of twisted stitches and colourwork to create a quilted effect. A perfect go to colour work yarn with great grip and definition is Hillesvåg Sølje with a great selection of colours to choose the right combo.

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I can see Eryza by Meiju K-P becoming that go to cardigan you can throw over anything. A warm hug perfect for layering up in a chilly office, or for going on a frosty country walk. This one also takes on the great joys of double stranding, to create a soft fuzzy cloud like texture. Try a solid Socks Yeah DK paired with the fluffy Fyberspates Cumulus in a complimentary or even contrasting colour.

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Kouhei by Whitney Hayward is a wide embracing cardigan. Simple but classic. An easy shape to knit and wear. Its worked from the bottom up, flat, until the underarm, where the fronts and back are separated and worked flat until the shoulder. Knit this one in a warm Hillesvåg Blåne.

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Laemmin by Renate Kamm, a simple waistcoat/vest that has an overall pleasing checkerboard texture and nice small cable details on the back. A generous neckline and clean shape, go together to make for understated elegance. Worked flat and trimmed with a neat i-cord edge, it would make a great layer under a jacket or over a shirt. Knit this one in the new Kate Davies Àrd-Thìr which would give great stitch definition.

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What a stunning colour work garment this is. Marit by Kristin Drysdale features an all over fair isle pattern in three colours. This cardigan lets you have a go at one of knittings scariest techniques, steeking! The centre opening and armholes all use steeking, which I might add is great fun and less scary than you imagine. I good toothy yarn that grips well is good for this project, get stuck into the wide colour palette of Hillesvåg Sølje.

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I love the simple boxy shape of Nerea by Lærke (Fiber Tales). It also has an interesting construction. Knit sideways, in two halves, beginning from the sleeve cuff moving on to the body and seamed down the front using Russian grafting. A technique that uses a crochet hook, which I think makes for a pleasing detail down the front. Effortlessly minimal and topped off with a feathery calliper cable along the sleeves. I would knit this in John Arbon’s Devonia DK.

laine11Who would say no to a luscious over sized scarf. Especially one so simple but so effective. Rambla by Alejandra Pont, knit in bands of alternating knits and purls makes it reversible and a great beginner project. When I think luscious, I always think of Fyberspates Scrumptious 4ply, its silk and merino blend the perfect thing for wearing next to our skin.

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Talla by Dami Hunter is a two colour cowl project, making use of the mosaic technique. A fun way of building up a colour work project while only knitting one colour per row. This way minimising a twisty mess that can sometime result from some two colour projects. Try the soft Vivacious 4ply for its undulating colours and pick two with a nice contrast.

I hope you enjoy this issue and have fun choosing your yarns for this issue. It certainly feels like a wintery instalment, with an overriding colour theme of blues and greys set against the snowy landscape. I think that’s why there seems to be a lot of oversized projects here, one that you want to wrap up in and keep the cold out.

 

New Yarn: Àrd-Thìr by Kate Davies Designs

It’s a pleasure to introduce Àrd-Thìr a new Aran weight yarn by Kate Davies in collaboration with one of our favourite yarn producers Fyberspates. It will not disappoint, such an amazing colour range and feels wonderful.

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Àrd-Thìr means Highlands in Scottish Gaelic and you couldn’t get a better name than that. A combination of 60% Peruvian Highland Wool and 40% Superfine Alpaca, it is produced in the Peruvian Highlands. But it’s colour inspiration comes from the Scottish Highlands. To be more specific the Scottish winter landscape. In 10 shades, Kate Davies says of her colour choice:

‘Our winter landscape is often thought to be drained of colour, but if you look carefully, you’ll discover a mix of many interesting shades: from the deepening russet tones of bracken-covered hillsides to the luminous hues of lichen hanging from bare branches; from the glancing orange glow of sunlight across high rocky peaks to the extraordinarily rich colour of a sealoch under a leaden Februrary sky. Each of the ten shades I’ve designed is a subtle, muted marl; each possesses its own depth and tonal variety; some can be combined into intriguing gradients, and all work together harmoniously as a range.’

This approach to the colours adds a richness and complexity, which would not only be fun to knit, but also produce beautiful knitwear.

Àrd-Thìr is worsted spun aran weight yarn. The combination of fibres make it well rounded, soft and squishy. It feels amazing next to the skin and would be perfect for many garments and accessories. I’m thinking oversized snuggly cabled jumpers or warm textured scarves. It would knit up to make something warm and cosy and would be perfect for textures, cables and colourwork. In 50g (65m/75yd) skeins it is the perfect yarn for when a little bit of a contrast colour or a colour work motif is needed. The possibilities are endless. There is something comforting about having a nice aran weight project on your needles in winter. Quick to knit and satisfying, it makes a change from all those 4ply projects!

Kate Davies has released two patterns for this yarn, so you can drool over them and take some inspiration. One hat and one pullover. This gives you a chance to see how the yarn knits up and maybe start planning that next project.

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The Weel Riggit Pullover is an all over colour work jumper, featuring a simple repeating pattern making the full use of the complimentary tones in Àrd-Thìr. Riggit in Scots and Shetland dialect means “rigged out” or “dressed”. To be “weel riggit” is to be well dressed. What better name can there be for this handsome jumper.

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The Weel Riggit Hat lets you sample the colour combinations of the jumper but in this smaller project. Using 4 skeins in 4 different shades to produce the perfect winter accessory. A fun project for having a play with your favourite colours.

I hope the rich tones in this yarn will help you chase away the winter blues and get knitting something cosy and warm.

Trio Shawl KAL – Colour Inspiration

You may have seen Maya’s post introducing the Trio Shawl and the first Knit With Attitude KAL of the year. If that hasn’t got you racing to your needles then maybe these colour inspirations will.

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This shawl is great for the beginner and experienced knitter alike. The simple knitting is made for indulging in your favourite fibres and colours. Combining three, the formula is simple: 2 parts MC, 1 part CC1 and 1 part CC2. You are also not restricted to a certain yarn weight or having to make a shawl using all the same bases or fibres. With this shawl you can yield to all those skeins you have been dreaming of and not really found the project for. Heavier weights will give you a larger shawl and light weights will give you a smaller one and why not combine them together for a texture adventure. Maya is combining a 4ply, a light 4ply and a heavy DK with her’s. It’s a good idea to knit a little swatch with your chosen yarns and adjust the needle size to get the quality of fabric you like.

Below I have put together some suggestions using DK and 4ply weights. Merino, Norwegian Pelssau, Romney and Shetland, Buck Mohair and Dalla Sheep yarns. Hand dyed and Undyed. No restrictions here!

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This combo uses Hillesvåg Vilje as the MC, incorporating the earthy Kettle Yarn Ramble in Gorse and Black Elephant Minis in Tranquility for the contrasts.

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Here I have opted for a darker MC to allow the bright yellow and white shades pop out. Hillesvåg Sølje in Beige for the MC and Garnsurr Pan in Sneivin and Black Elephant Minis in Nostalgia.

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This combo is about a punchy bright contrast, drawing out the pinks of the speckled minis. Hillesvåg Vilje as the MC with Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Coral and Black Elephant Minis in Lazy Days.

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The combination offers a more moody contrast with the white but still having a few colour pops from the hand dyed. Hillesvåg Vilje for the MC and Sølje in Rød and Garnsurr Pan in Tarik Roshan for the contrasts.

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I love a pink and green combo and these muted tones have a vintage quality. Hillesvåg Vilje and Kettle Yarn Ramble in Hawthorne and Black Elephant Minis in Arlandria.

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I flipped the MC on it’s head with this one. Using a black instead a white will make your contrasts pop, like neon lights against the night sky. The MC here is Sølje in Svart with Garnsurr Pan in Gryteflaks #3 and Black Elephant Minis in Blame Fawkes for the CC’s.

I hope these combo’s give you some inspiration and I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

 

What do you get the knitter that has everything…

This time of year we are struggling to find that perfect gift for our knitting friends and maybe even that cheeky Christmas present for ourselves. Yarn, Tools and accessories can sometimes be tricky. Knowing what a knitter has already, what yarn they like, their favourite colour can be a mine field. So what about a book? A book as gift, is a gift of possibilities. It is inspiration, it might push you to try something new, they look gorgeous and hey, its fun to read something that’s not on a screen!

Below I have curated some inspiring gift ideas for Christmas, with a book as a starting point. With each book I have tried to match fun yarns that compliment the knits inside and even a few accessories that might be useful.
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The first book kicking off the book gift guides is Stephen West’s – West Knits Best Knits – Shawls. There is nothing more bright and fun than these crazy shawls. With a great eye for colour and clever construction Stephen West’s Shawls are guaranteed to keep a knitter amused. I’ve paired this book with, of course Hedgehog Fibres. These unique bright speckled hand dyed yarns lend themselves perfectly to these patterns. Seen here are Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Heyday, Coral, Oracle and Poppy. Complimented by a little Ditty Bag for the knitter to tote around all those WIP’s. I also thought these Flower Power Scissors capture the fun and whimsy seen in Stephen’s Designs and make the perfect yarn end snipper.

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Here is The Doodler by Stephen West from the book. A popular design that has endless ways of using those favourite hand dyed 4ply skeins.

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The second book I’ve looked at is a new one here at Knit With Attitude and we are bowled over by it, see our blog post book review. It’s Strange Brew by Tin Can Knits. Perfect for the knitter that is nerdy about their knitting and likes to tackle bigger projects. Yoked sweaters call out to Léttlopi. A few balls of this yarn will get them well on there way to planning a colourful yoke of their own. Big projects need big project bags and the Plystre Cross Body Bag can easily take a jumpers worth. Also key accessories, matching Putford Scissors, Cocoknits Stitch Markers and the very useful Hey Mama Wolf’s Wool Soap.

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Almanac from the book, knit in Léttlopi, shows you how much fun you can have with colour.

susanThe Vintage Shetland Project needs no introduction. A great work from designer Susan Crawford. A collection of historically informed traditional Shetland knitting patterns, researched and designed by Susan herself. Keeping the tradition of Shetland knitting alive. This book is great just to flick through and absorb the wonderful photography and amazing knitwear. Nothing else needs pairing with this book apart from Susan’s own yarn Fenella. A palette of vintage inspired colours on a British wool, bliss!

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Rose from the book shows you the stunning quality of the patterns inside. Knit in Fenella it also shows how perfect this yarn is for colour work.

crochetOne for the crocheters, Everyday Wearables by Joanne Scrace is a collection of well designed and imaginative crochet patterns. If you are looking to inspire a new craft or know an avid crocheter this is a great book. We also carry a wide range of bamboo crochet hooks. Bamboo is kind to your hands and has a little more give then their metal cousins. This book contains a lot of patterns in Socks Yeah Dk. This great yarn has many uses, it’s not just for socks! I’ve included some Storklette Scissors in this combo. Why? Just look at how cut they are!

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The Brenn Hat from the book is Crocheted from Socks Yeah Dk and made from two or three skeins makes the perfect little gift if you are looking to add yarn into the mix.

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Knitting Outside the Box by Bristol Ivy is a stunning book. Beautiful in design and photography. It’s more than a book of patterns, Bristol Ivy takes you through her techniques. It’s informative as well as useful. I’ve matched in some Fyberspates Vivacious DK seen here in Deep Aqua, Denim and Deep Forest. The Cocoknits Rustic Yarn Snips make a nice earthy but useful pairing. Along with these shawl pins, every good shawl needs a shawl pin and these Jul Ewe and Ram Pins in white brass are a stylish sheep nod to the source of your knitwear.

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Canady from the book is knit in a Merino Dk. A perfect choice would be Fyberspates Vivacious DK and wrap yourself in its luscious softness.

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Lastly is Vogue Knitting – The Ultimate Knitting Book. What more can a knitter need. Experienced and novice knitters alike will benefit from this book. It contains all a knitter needs ton know about construction, shaping, stitch techniques, it literally is the bible of knitting. The ultimate knitting book needs an ultimate yarn. Kettle Yarn’s Hand Dyed Islington DK is a sumptuous blend of Blue Faced Leicester and Silk, in such dreamy tones. One of these skeins would definitely put a smile on someone’s face. A classy Petrol Plystre Crossbody Project Bag completes the look with a sophisticated pair of Silver Putford Scissors.

I hope this has given you some inspiration at a tricky time of year. No matter how big or how small, if you are looking for a knitting gift we hopefully have something for you. If you find yourself stuck with what to get, spend a little time with our books and you might find something.

Yarn Feature: Garthenor Number 1

We have had this yarn for a little while at Knit With Attitude and it’s really nice to revisit it and give it it’s time in the limelight.

If you are looking for organic and British, Garthenor is for you. Starting in the 1990’s Garthernor produced wool from their own flock, as they grew they have expanded into buying fleece directly from farmers around the UK. Their mission is to promote and provide a variety of sustainable, organic & British wool products in an ecologically responsible way. Through this they aim to help secure the future of British organic agriculture and the British textile industry.

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Garthenor Number 1 is an undyed, wooden spun, single ply, lace weight yarn. It’s has the biggest range of shades of any undyed yarn we carry. Eleven in total! All eleven colours are produced by blending just eight different colours of fleece, giving a yarn with a wonderfully heathered depth. This yarn is perfect for garments as well as accessories like shawls and hats.

It’s always nice to have a little look at some patterns. Here is a selection below to get you thinking about your next project:

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Amory by Isabell Kraemer is a uncomplicated, seamless top down jumper. With its simple neckline and lace bottom, it’s elegant but wearable. The lightness of the yarn making it the perfect jumper for adding layers.

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Vederlicht by Cello Knits. These cosy leg warmers, or arm warmers, are perfect for adding that extra layer for winter. Whats better is they only take one 50g skein.

P1260315Mahy by Karie Westermann. A classic triangle shawl with bold lace panels. Garter stitch rows making perfect use of Garthenor’s earthy qualities.

I hope this post gets you excited about knitting with lace. It’s earthy texture and colour will lend a warm tone to anything knit in it. Giving you a light but rustic fabric.

Marled Projects and more and how to stash dive with success!

We are all getting starstruck by all the marled and exciting patterns being released at the moment and a lot of you have been asking me for colour ideas and options for putting together great combos. Stephen West is at the forefront of marled designs at the moment. With patterns like the Marled Magic Sweater and the Marled Magic Cardigan. But a Marled effect can be added into any project. If you treat two strands of fingering/4ply held together as a worsted weight you are good to go and can apply a marl to any of your favourite worsted patterns.

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Marled Magic Cardigan by Stephen West

There are many ways of approaching a marled project. Do you start from scratch? Do you curate your stash and pull out colour themes? Do you chose one base colour to tie things together? Or do you throw everything you have at it? Well the possibilities are endless. What’s freeing about a marled project is that there really aren’t any rules. You can play with different fibres and to some degree different weights. You don’t have to stick to the same brand, but can go with your heart. Below I have put together some ideas and thoughts that you might find useful for your own marled projects.

Building a marled project from scratch

If you are looking to build up a selection of yarns and don’t have any stash lying around to throw into the mix, then this first section is for you.

I shall use the example of Stephen West’s latest Marled Magic Cardigan for this first marled section. This is how I would approach it, but everyone has their own take on things.  It is recommended you have between 750 – 1300g of yarn for this project with between 150 – 200g of each yarn to be used in the collar and cuffs. So here we go!

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Keeping it bright! You can almost approach a marled project like you would a faded project. But unlike a fade where you want one skein to blend into the next a marled project can be a little more extreme. With this one I have chosen the Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Plump and the Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #18 held together for the collar and cuffs. I’ve then picked some favourite colours starting with Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #19. I then let the skein decide where I go next. Plenty of speckles in these hand dyed’s give multiple avenues for combination. Which has led me to get quite nerdy about yarn!

Yarns pictured above, from left to right:

Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Plump, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #18, Gryteflaks #19, Sneivin,  Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Raku, Sorbet, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Preinas, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Gossip, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #18, Hørningen,  Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Bubble, Deja Vu and then back to Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #18.

With this combination I was trying to evoke a feeling of the original colours.

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In the image I have broken down a section and shown how the colours link up. I feel working in this way would give a good framework to build up a selection of yarns. You don’t have to knit them in any particular order, but there is a thought process in the choosing, that helps you wade through the endless variety out there. There is infinite array of colour and colour combinations, but looking into the colour make up of a skein of yarn can really help when trying to find the perfect combination.

Starting on the left I have Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #18 with its reds to almost creamy, peachy orange. This colour is then picked out to link into Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Sorbet, which has a peachy base flecked with other colours. This technique is repeated by the end three, where pinks and greens unify them. But they also open up other colours, like blue and black. In this way you are building a selection of colours that focuses in on smaller details in the yarn as well as bigger ones. Allowing you to go on a journey of colour, that might lead to unexpected results.

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Keeping it mellow. In this combination I have really gone for a colour theme. You will end up with a more uniform marl, in a combination like this. Picking a colour family and playing around it is a fun way to work. It allows you the opportunity to work with your favourite colour, or not, if you want to push your boundaries. The more you look at a colour the more you will see how many colours lie within it’s boundaries, giving you a rich overall palette to play with.

If you are working in this way and sticking to a particular range of colours, I think it is important to choose plenty of light and darks. This way the combinations will remain interesting and not become to similar or dull. In the same way I think a few colour pops within a skein is a good idea. Like the yellow that appears in Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Æsjbikkje and the pinks and blues that appear in Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Hawk and Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Frevil / Shauparak. These pops will shine out in marled fabric, where a few zaps of contrast colour playing against a monochrome background.

Yarns pictured above, from left to right:

Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Cereal, Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply – Silver and Bronze, Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles – Scilence, Crystal, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Fonne / Bered, Æsjbikkje, Gryteflaks #10, Gryteflaks #10, Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply – Verdegris, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Hawk, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #19, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Cereal, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Frevil / Shauparak

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And because I like doing it, here is the colour break down for a section of this one. You can see the combination of lights and darks with a few little colour pops like the yellow and pink. It may even need something white/cream or a very pale blue to lift it slightly.

Using stash yarns and curating a colour theme

We all have a bunch of half skeins and end of project balls of yarn hanging around and a marled project is perfect for using these up, no matter what quantity you have. Even if you feel your stash is a little random and won’t go together there will be that perfect skein that will unite them. One way of getting around this problem is curating your stash into colour themes and families. I have tried this with parts of my stash below and mixed in various Knit With Attitude yarns. Any caked yarn or yarn in a ball in the below pictures are ones I have pulled from my stash, around which I have placed complimentary yarns I think work well.

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First up we have this pinky purple number. I am still with the idea of creating the Marled Magic Cardigan pictured at the beginning of this post. This cardigan has a contrast, or at least a very defined collar, cuffs and hem. To stick with the theme I have gone with Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Iris and Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply – Heavenly. They draw on the purple theme but keep it light, this way I hope they offset the body colours and make them pop.

I have some orange and pink and pinky oranges in my stash I didn’t think they would necessarily work in this project, until I saw the Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Annsam skein, perfection! Marled at different points in the project this will bring a nice theme of pink and orange, throughout. The deep purples in the middle really spoke to some of the purples I had in my stash along with a few creams. The pinks range from neon to a more muted dusky pink, complimenting and working with the pinks I already have.

I would recommend not knitting them in the order that is show in the image but chopping and changing throughout the project. This way colour themes will appear and disappear throughout the knitting. As it is marled you will then avoid getting clumps of a dominating colour and end up with a more even project.

Colours I have used around my stash from left to right:

Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Iris, Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply – Heavenly, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Annsam, Krilla, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Plump,  Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Jarbær, Hey Mama Wolf – Sockyarn #04 Minis – Madder, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Ortle / Mihifar.

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I feel this one doesn’t need a colour break down, even though I enjoy making them. It’s green, oh green! If you haven’t guessed it’s my favourite colour. So my stash is full of it. We all have a favourite colour so naturally our stash is going to be full of it. Why not embrace that and indulge in your colour love. I’ve fallen in love with this combination, it’s like a mossy forest floor, I am so tempted to knit it myself.

With this combination you will end up with a very subtle fabric. Each colour melding into one another. Some say it is safe to go with the same colour, I say it’s well informed. With these combination I would probably make sure I was always holding a solid with a speckled, that way the solid gets enlivened by the changing colours of the speckle. But here there is a good combination of light and dark and it shows you the real variety you can get in a colour.

Colours I have used around my stash from left to right:

Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace – Parklife, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Preinas, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Cereal, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Løpp, Kettle Yarn Co Beyul – Shrub, Garnsurr Søkke Merino – Gryteflaks #11, Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock – Parklife, Kettle Yarn Co Beyul – Jade

 

Using one colour to unite a random stash

Not all of our stash is coordinated and if you are desperate to use of every last scrap of those random ends of yarn then this method might be good for you.

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Choosing a colour that you think might tie a project together like this Coopknits Socks Yeah – Azurite in this one.  This way no matter how random your other pieces might be, there will always be one constant. Here I have pink, yellow, grey, green, purple! They may look random like this, but knit up the blue will catch the eye, bringing harmony to the project. With this selection you can further reinforce the theme by sticking to the same colour for collars and cuffs.

I’ve tried to illustrate this idea with the blue throughout, giving the marl a base colour which then brings unity to the other colours. It also means you can indulge in your favourite colour and let that be the colour that shines through the project.

I hope that you find some of these ideas of approaching a marled project useful. From building a collection of yarns from scratch, from curating your stash into colour themes or even uniting a random stash. Marled projects are a great way to use up leftovers but also great to let you branch out into other colours you might not necessarily use. These projects are about having fun, so get stuck in and throw everything you have got at it.

New Yarn: Kettle Yarn Co. – Ramble

The beautiful shades and consciously sourced British fibres are what makes Kettle Yarn so wonderful. Linda always amazes, with her interesting blends and eye for colour. Ramble is definitely up there, and typifies these strengths.

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Ramble is a small-batch British yarn. Spun from the finest graded fibres of British Shetland and Romney sheep. 100g of a fingering/4ply weight woolen spun yarn. Woolen spun, giving this yarn a plumpness to the twist, that is light, springy and also lofty. Drawing on a centuries-rich history of sheep rearing and wool production from the Shetland Isles and England’s smugglers paradise, Romney Marshes. The fibre is sourced directly from the farmers, spun and dyed in the UK and with with very little processing. Giving you a stunning heathered yarn, with a rustic feel in the hand, that blooms beautifully.

A perfect toothy yarn that will perform well over colour work projects, but also giving good definition on twisted stitches and cables. With a flexible gauge, that knit densely, will give you a warm and durable fingering/4ply weight. Knit loosely, will give you a more bouncy sport to DK weight, the wooden-spun yarn filling out the looser fabric.

If you are looking for some inspiration for this yarn, then look no further. We have put together a selection of patterns to get you inspired:

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Tender by Melody Hoffmann is a simple shawl that is all about the texture. It shows you Ramble’s strength in holding definition. Simple garter stitch, with some chevron panels, build up to create an eye catching subtle fabric. Knit in three skeins of Ramble, shown here in Hawthorn, the pattern is easily adjustable to go larger.

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Atlantic Avenue by Kirsten Kapur is a three colour triangle shawl, with a body of colour work and ending in a bold, statement colour band. Use the gorgeous shades of Ramble to mix and match your own. The example show is knit in Meadowsweet, Nightshade and Hawthorne.

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If you are thinking of sweaters, then what about East or West by Joji Locatelli, here knit in Ramble by Linda of Kettle Yarn Co. Shown here in colours Nightshade, Meadowsweet and Gorse, Ramble is a versatile yarn for all kinds of sweater projects.

If you are looking for a yarn and are passionate about British, then this is the yarn for you. Small scale, conscious and beautiful, what more do you need for your next project!

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New Yarn: Ístex Bulkylopi

A firm favourite here at Knit with attitude is the Léttlopi, but this yarn has just got supersized! In the form of Bulkylopi, what a fun yarn to see you into the winter. Like the Léttlopi, its made form 100% sturdy Icelandic wool, and comes in a variety of natural shades. I can see this becoming a much loved yarn.

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A single ply chunky yarn, which is perfect for anything from colour work jumpers, to big cosy sofa blankets. Affordable but also durable. The inner fibres of this yarn are fine, soft and highly insulating. The outer fibres are long, glossy and water-repellent. Together, these two distinctive fibres create a wool that is, lightweight, water-repellent and breathable. The  wool is bought directly from the farmers in Iceland and then scoured in the town of Blönduós in north of the country. The wool is then taken to be spun in a mill in Mosfellsbaer nearby Reykjavik. This yarn is Icelandic through and through.

As with any new yarn we are excited to show you some possibilities to get the creativity flowing. Here are a couple patterns to get you started:

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Everyone needs more project bags right? The Lopi Tote by Heidi Gustad is a super cute large project bag for all those projects on the go. Knit in two skeins of Bulkyopi, this deep wide bottom bag can hold a lot. Finished off with leather bag handles from Jūl for the perfect elegant touch.

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Ever wanted to try an Icelandic yoked sweater but thought it might be to time consuming. Well thats what a chunky yarn is for. Knit on 9mm and 10mm needles this project will race along. Rosa by Védís Jónsdóttir is a simple yoked sweater worked in the round. A perfect one for the beginner.

I hope you have been inspired to knit with the Bulkyopi, browse the colours online or come in store and see it in person.

The Attitude Cowl by Julie Knits in Paris

Last weekend we had the awesome designer Julie Knits in Paris and the amazing Linda from the Kettle Yarn Co in the shop. It was great to have both an inspiring designer and yarn dyer together. What’s more is Julie was launching her splendid pattern ‘Attitude’, which is knit in Linda’s yarn: Kettle Yarn – Islington DK. We are in love with this pattern as it represents the good attitude of the knitting community and the little dancing people motif also showing us knitters like to paaaaaarty!

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Attitude is an extraordinary, large colour work cowl, knit in the round. With cute draw string ties, so you can wear it in many ways. Pulled down over your shoulders for some warmth under a jacket, or with the drawstrings pulled tight for extra cosy warmth around your neck.

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Knit in Kettle Yarn – Islington DK, a luminous blend of Blue Faced Leister and Silk, the yarn simply glows. Combined like this in a colour work project you end up with a garment that just sings. Featuring a motif of little dancing people with attitude!

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We are now fully stocked on Kettle Yarn – Islington DK in many colours, what will you choose? Below we have some suggestions to get yourself started, or come in store and have a play with combinations.

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The original one – Used in Julie’s original Attitude. The colours are from left to right: Kettle Yarn – Islington DK – Pom, Siren Call and Blighty.

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The pinky one – This combination is playing on Julie’s original colours but going along a pink route. The colours are from left to right: Kettle Yarn – Islington DK – Peony, Red Velvet and Icicle.

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The earthy one – This one is going a little more earthy, using autumnal colours. The colours are from left to right: Kettle Yarn – Islington DK – Ochre, Macbeth and Marigold.

Have fun with this project and combine colours that you love. If you would like to see the cowl in person, we have it here in the shop for a short while so you can try is on for yourself.

Yarn Pairings for Laine Magazine Issue 6

We wait with bated breath when the new issue of Laine is announced. We are totally in love with this beautiful Nordic knitting magazine. With its stunning photography, inspirational articles and amazing patterns, Laine has become one of those magazines we just can’t wait to get our hands on. This Autumn/Winter Issue does not disappoint. As usual we have put together our recommendations for yarn pairings for NO# SIX – HERITAGE. Enjoy!

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First up is Afterparty by Astrid Troland. This seamless bottom up jumper, featuring a simple but interesting colour work yoke, is all about the pattern. Chose two contrasting colours to make the yoke pop. The Fibre Co. Cumbria would be a beautiful choice for this. A Wool, Merino and Mohair blend with a lovely range of colours. Luscious!

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Arbusto by Rosa Pomar is the next jumper. This fun and elegant sweater is worked inside out, giving you the purl texture on the right side. For added texture little bobbles give this pattern a touch of whimsy. Knitted in Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk – Tinde’s earthy colours would give this garment a real depth.

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Elfriede by Shannon Cook is a sideways asymmetrical triangle shawl that is knitted corner to corner starting with one cast-on stitch. Knit in the worsted weight The Fibre Co. – Cumbria. We have Cumbria in a 4ply weight so try holding this yarn doubled to get a thicker worsted weight.

laine_6_shannoncook_sk-3-2Hryggir by Hélène Magnússon is a beautiful pattern taking it’s name from mountain edges in Icelandic. A lacy yoke starts this project, then aggressively blocked. The body is worked and shaping is created by changing needle size. For this pattern it has to be Garthenor Number 1, it’s undyed natural tones, the perfect compliment.

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Poet by Sari Nordlund is a seamless top down sweater. A bold graphic lace pattern covers the front and the back. This calls for a yarn that has great stitch definition like Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk – Sølje.

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Selenite by Annie Rowden is a classic top down open cardigan. Lace work adds a nice detail to the raglan seam and is carried down the sides. With simple shaping it will provide a simple autumn layer for keeping out the cold. A yarn with an interesting but soft texture might work well here like The Fibre Co. – Luma.

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Sideways by Joji Locatelli is worked, you guessed it, sideways! Starting centre back one side is worked out towards the sleeve, then the back stitches are picked up and you work the other side. This gives you a fun collection of horizontal cables, that mirror each other. For a sumptuous an indulgent knit, use Fyberspates – Scrumptious Aran.

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Sode by Hiroko Payne is another gorgeous cabled cardigan. This technique heavy knit is one for the knitter who likes a challenge. Techniques used include top down contiguous knitting, cabled lifted directional increases, German short rows, and three-needle bind-off. A knit like this needs to be treated with respect and what better way then the wonderful The Fibre Co. – Terra.

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Tortoiseshell by Emily Wessel will become that shawl everyone needs for winter warmth. A simple triangular shape with a lace border. This piece is all about being cosy. A cosy knit needs a cosy yarn and the plumpness of Du Store Alpakka – Alpakka Tweed is the cosiest!

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Vav by Esther Romo a simple scarf with a lot of charm. Featuring a vertical herringbone stitch, to not only give you a lovely fabric, but to also keep you interested as you knit. Du Store Alpakka – Hexa is warm, bouncy and perfect for this.

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Vinr by Andrea Mowry are toe up socks featuring an interesting collection of cabled stitches. For great stitch definition in the cables, choose a sock yarn like Hey Mama Wolf – Sockyarn #04.

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Virginia by Jonna Hietala, is a perfect beginner knit, simple but elegant. A boxy sweater, knit in one piece and its reversible. An exciting yarn like Hedgehog Fibre – Merino Dk will shine through this simple pattern.

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I hope you find some inspiration from our pairings for this issue. Don’t forget to tag us into your projects if you went for any of our suggestions. The new issue of Laine is now available in store and online.