Yarn Pairings for Pom Pom Quarterly Issue 25 – Summer 2018

New magazine days are always fun here at the shop, and we are absolutely in love with the latest issue from Pom Pom Quarterly. Summer 2018 is Issue 25 for them and it does not disappoint. Spring can be a bit of a tricky season for knitwear but here there is loads of inspiration. One reason this issue is so good is that they have picked one of the best hot weather themes, it’s all about stripes! There are 11 patterns, ranging from sweaters, t-shirts, wraps and even a practical bag. We have matched each pattern with a yarn available here in the shop to help inspire your knitting and summer projects. The yarns featured are all fantastic for summer projects, and highlights some of the non-wool and vegan yarns that we carry. 

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First up is Anni, by Gina Röckenwagner, a t-shirt that is simple in shape but not in style! It features both horizontal and vertical stripes using three colours, with one of the colours used for solid cuffs, hem and neckline. There is so much fun to be had with this pattern in terms of choosing colours, from bold contrasts to more subtle shades. With this in mind we would recommend the Nurturing Fibres Eco-Cotton, which we carry in 18 different colours.

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Next up is Bayadere, by Lori Versaci. This boxy, oversized sweater is a cozy best friend to reach for all year round! Knit up in a cotton/wool blend like Spud & Chloë Sweater it works brilliantly as a transitional garment between the seasons, as well as those unseasonably cold evenings that are inevitable in a British summer! It uses three colours in a mix of textural stripes.

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Deauville by Tina Tse is versatile boxy tank top. Worked in stripes that seem simple from afar, they also feature a subtle texture up close that stops it from being too stark. The recommended yarn is one we carry, Wool and the Gang’s Shiny Happy Cotton, its wide colour palette again means that there are loads of options for colour combinations.

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Herrera by Paula Pereira would make a fantastic beach cover up with it’s boxy super oversized casual look. Knit in a linen it is also easy care and will only get better with age and wear. We recommend the Växbo Lin Lingarn 12/2 which comes in a wide range of bright summery colours.

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Next up is Lia Moya’s Judoka, a striped bag with a fun construction. Knit in one long piece it is then seamed to create the over all shape, and two corners are knotted to create the handle. Using a few colours of stripes this would be a good stash buster to use up leftover bits and bobs, but we would also love to see it in the Nurturing Fibres Eco-Fusion, a blend of bamboo and cotton.

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Leiden one of our favourite patterns out of this issue, but we might be biased as it was designed by Natalie Selles, our resident knitting teacher here at the shop! It turns usual striped tops on its head by including chevron stripes that run both vertically and horizontally in a panel that is knit first. Stitches are then picked up and knit outwards from there, joining up with the back to knit the sides and sleeves. There are attached i-cord edgings for a polished finish on all the hems and cuffs. Because of the modular construction there is absolutely no seaming in this top! Overall this top works as a both formal and casual wardrobe addition that is sure to get plenty of use in any wardrobe. To add to the comfortable feel of the shirt, we would love to see it knit up in The Fibre Co.’s Luma, a summery lush blend of wool, cotton, linen and silk.

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Macklin by Susanne Sommer is a beautiful oversized wrap knit using short rows to create a bias for maximum drape. The brioche is two colour with hardly and contrast, and then 2 contrasting stripe colours for a total of four colours used all together. We think that Hedgehog Skinny Singles would work brilliantly for this project, with loads of colour options to choose from. The contrasting stripe colours use only a very small amount of yarn, so perfect for using up any leftovers you may have from other projects.

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Nasreen by Lana Jois is another pattern taking traditional garter stitch stripes and turning them slightly on their head for a biased effect. The tunic shape is easy to wear, featuring a rib at the top and bottom and a finished edge on the armhole worked in a single colour. A yarn such as Stollen Stitches Nua, a mix of merino, yak and linen, continues the drapey feel of the design.

Nasreen_by_Lana_Jois_Pom_Pom_Quarterly_Issue_25_Summer_2018_07_medium2Another top using the garter ridge stripes is Riley, by Amy Christoffers. It features a bottom panel knit side to side, from which the centre panel is knit vertically on both the front and the back, last of all the side panels are picked up and knit outwards towards the sleeves. This is another perfect occasion to use the Nurturing Fibres Eco-Cotton, with it’s range of colours and soft fabric.

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The last garment from this issue is Tarmac, by resident Pom Pom writer Anna Maltz. This swingy tank top is worked from top-down using a provisional cast on to work the front and back separately, before joining again at the underarms to work the rest of the body. The shape is created from yarn over increases in the body, and all the edges are finished with a striped applied i-cord edging. For something this lightweight we love the idea of knitting it up in The Fibre Co. Meadow, a luxurious blend of merino, llama, silk and linen.

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Last but not least is Vasarley, an oversized wrap from Julie Dubreux of Julie Knits in Paris. The rectangular wrap is worked from the centre of one of the short sides for a chevron/bias effect. It is worked in two colours using slipped stitches to create the overall striped look. For an extra drapey look Manos del Uruguay’s Serena would be perfect.

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This issue is proof that knitting doesn’t have to be confined to the winter months, there are so many options and ideas for summery, hot weather garments and accessories out there! Any pieces catching your eye? The issue is currently up for pre-order on the website and will be shipped out by May 25, 2018.

Yarn Pairings for Pom Pom Issue 20 Spring 2017

We’ve had another knockout issue arrive from Pom Pom Quarterly! The Spring 2017 issue is number 20, and is jam packed with sweaters and accessories to bring you through to the warmer months.

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The cover shawl is a beautiful and wearable Arrosa by Jennifer Weissman. It uses 2 skeins of Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock, which we have lots of in-stock at the moment. An extra lovely detail is to use a leftover bit of yarn in a contrast colour for the bind off to create a pop of colour.

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Astera by Grace Gouin is a practical take on a market shopping bag. Using Shiny Happy Cotton held double you would get a sturdy fabric that would hold it’s shape and whatever you threw into it as well. We also have beautiful handmade leather handles in the shop from Jul designs to complete your bag.

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Bombus is the first of the sweater designs in this issue. The cardigan, designed by Miriam Jarrs, seamlessly manages to combine a bomber jacket with a quilted bed jacket and come out the other side looking stylish! The top down design would work well in a yarn that holds its stitch definition well, like Fyberspates Vivacious DK.

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While Pom Pom is primarily a knitting magazine, they do usually include a crochet pattern as well. This issue has Hanabira, a top down cardigan by Eline Alcocer. The flower petal detail at the cuffs and hem leave endless options for personalization, and with one of our newest yarns, Blue Sky Fibers Baby Alpaca Sport, there’s lots of colour options!

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Izumi is our favourite sweater in the issue, though we may be biased as it was designed by our own Natalie Selles! This sweatshirt style pullover has a plain stocking stitch body and sleeves, with a gorgeous cabled and lace stitch pattern in the shoulder areas and cuffs. We would love to see it knit up in John Arbon Knit By Numbers, which with a buttery soft hand would only make this sweater even more lush!

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Melli is another wearable cardigan pattern from Camille Rosselle. This boxy jumper is oversized but cropped for more practicality. The subtle bee stitch texture breaks up the reverse stocking stitch would work well with both speckled yarns as shown in the sample, or in a solid as well. With speckled texture what other yarn could you recommend than Hedgehog Fibres Merino DK.

Odonata-Pom-Pom-Quaterly-Issue-20-Spring-2017The last pullover pattern of the issue is Odonata by Courtney Cedarholm. The tunic length adds a bit of drama to it, with a smocked effect cable on the front, and a plain stocking stitch back and sleeves, with a ribbed and rolled edge. The drape of wool and silk blend of the Fyberspates Scrumptious 4ply would be perfect for this pattern.

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The hat pattern of this issue is designed by Anna Maltz. Signal features 6 colours of a 4ply yarn. We love the colour options of a yarn like CoopKnits Socks Yeah! which comes in 16 shades. You would be sure to be able to find a combination that was just right for you.

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The last cardigan is Tinea, designed by Rachel Brockman. The drop shoulder style lends itself well to the upper shoulder design on the back, and the option of doing the ribbing in a contrast colour adds a bit of fun! Findley DK from Juniper Moon has a crispness that would show off the stitch pattern, and drape for the open fronts design.

We can’t wait to see what you make from the issue, it’s always fun to see people’s knits and choices. The magazine is on sale in the store and online.

Yarn of the Week: Tokonatsu

This week our highlight yarn is Tokonatsu by Noro. This DK weight yarn comes in a range of 8 muted jewel tones. It is a blend of cotton, silk and viscose, making it a wonderful yarn for summer and warmer weather garments. The yarn has a slubby blend, giving the finished fabric a slightly tweedy texture. This effect makes a wonderful canvas for stocking stitch, simple textures and stripes.

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For patterns, our favourite is Peridot, from the Noro Jewels collection booklet (available in-store only). The dolman sleeve design has a simple eyelet feature in a chevron for the front, which shows off the texture of the yarn beautifully.

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Noro has been making yarns in Japan under the guidance of its founder, Eisaku Noro, for over 40 years. All their fibre is sourced from certified organic farms which the company is actively involved in sourcing. They maintain strict standards to ensure a low environmental impact, from dye exhaust to machinery.

Use the code NORO15 online to get 15% off Tokonatsu until Sunday August 21st, while supplies last. Mention the sale in-store to receive the same offer.

Yarn of the Week: Serena

We would like to reintroduce an old favourite of ours, Yarn of the Week! We will highlight one yarn from the shop every week, with an offer and inspiration for projects.

Our first yarn is Serena, from Manos del Uruguay. This yarn is a 4ply/fingering weight blend of alpaca and cotton. It makes for a lightweight yarn with plenty of drape and movement, perfect for summer tops as well as shawls and accessories. It is kettle dyed for subtle semi-solids and carefully chosen variegated colour combinations with a stonewash finish.

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For patterns, we love this sweet summer top, Melo by Miriam L. Felton, available on Ravelry. It uses Serena as the main yarn, and then a worsted single such as Terra for the stripes. What a great combo!

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Melo by Miriam L. Felton. Image copyright Fairmount Fibers.

Manos del Uruguay is a registered Fair Trade yarn company from Uruguay, focusing on generating work for rural craftswomen. All of its yarns are manufactured according to Fair Trade regulations, generating fair and meaningful work for its employees.

Use the code SERENA15 online to get 15% off Serena until Sunday August 14th, while supplies last. Mention the sale in-store to receive the same offer.

 

 

Diana Sweater and Fairy Mist Snood

We have been working on boosting up our samples here in the shop. These projects are a great opportunity to show off our favourite yarns and some of our favourite designers. All of the patterns we have used are available in the shop, either as a hard copy or through the Ravelry In-store program. This is a fantastic program that allows designers to sell through local yarn stores. When they are designated for the program and a pattern is sold in a shop, a portion of the sale goes to the designer, just like with any wholesale scheme, except that the customer still gets the pattern added to their Ravelry library, and we can print it out for you!  This is an amazing service for everyone involved, shop, designer and customer. We are really embracing this program as it allows us to ‘carry’ thousands more patterns in the shop without taking up valuable shelf space or funds. Instead we only pay for a pattern when it is sold. This means we can really help you find the perfect pattern, instead of making do with one that isn’t quite right from a more limited selection!

Our mannequin is currently in summer mode, wearing a Wool and the Gang Supremes Sweater, knit in the Ivory White Shiny Happy Cotton. We love this yarn, and this pattern has been a hit in the shop since we got it! It’s got a boxy shape that is breezy for the summer, and comes in three different stitch pattern options for fun customization.

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Since this summer in London has been chilly so far, we have also added a lightweight cowl to keep the edge off! We used one skein of The Fibre Co.’s Meadow in Prairie to knit the Fairy Mist snood by Julie Crawford. This snood is a great pattern as it includes instructions to knit it in multiple weights of yarn, so you can really use any yarn you like. The only change we made was to make it a bit shorter to only use one skein.

We are happy to have this snood in the shop to show off this unusual yarn, and help everyone imagine it knit up. Meadow is a blend of Merino Wool, Baby Llama, Silk and Linen. It has a subtle drape with a slightly slubby texture from the silk and linen. The colours are slightly heathered as the different fibres take the dye in different ways, creating a final yarn with amazing depth that works well for both the lace and stocking stitch sections in the pattern.

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Lastly we topped the snood off with a sheep head shawl pin from Jul Designs. These white brass beauties are available as ewes or rams. They are a perfect intersection of beautiful and functional pieces. They are great worn as a brooch, shawl pin, or even a hair stick!

Take a peek at the samples in the shop the next time you are in to see these yarns and patterns in action!

Yarn Pairings for Making No.1 Flora

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How beautiful is our latest arrival? It’s of Making No.1 Flora, the first issue of a brand new magazine from Carrie Bostick Hoge of Madder Made. We could not be more excited here at the shop, and have been cooing and exclaiming over it all morning! This inaugural issue includes contributions from 21 different designers and makers across multiple craft disciplines, including knitting, crochet, sewing, cooking and embroidery.

As always we love to see the knitting patterns, and to pair them up with yarns we have in the shop.

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The first pattern is Branches and Buds, by the editor herself, Carrie Bostick Hoge. The pattern features a modern take on a classic colourwork yoked sweater in two high contrast colours. The little buds are added afterwards, the perfect use of leftover bits of yarn we all have. We would knit the main sweater up in Susan Crawford’s Excelana DK.

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Next up is the Flora Cardi and Cowl, also by Carrie Bostick Hoge. These two patterns use the same lace stitch, along the collar and fronts of the cardigan, and as an allover design for the cowl (or snood as we would say in the UK!). Worked up in different yarn weights it is an interesting way to see the same stitch pattern in different settings. The cardigan would have wonderful drape and be light as a feather in Fyberspates Scruptious Lace, while the snood would have more body with a heavier yarn such as Du Store Alpakka Fin.

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Susan B. Anderson has created a sweet pair of fairy dolls that tuck into little flower beds. A Flower Fairy would be a lovely toy for a wide range of ages. Blacker Swan comes in many colours to knit the flowers and leaves of your choice.

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Marigold is a seamless bottom up cardigan by Cecily Gowick MacDonald. With its shawl collar, 3/4 length sleeves and a lace panel up the back, it is an effortless addition to any summer wardrobe. We have 8 shades of the called for The Fibre Co. Meadow in stock to knit it in.

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Another cardigan is Silver Leaf, by Hannah Fettig. This sweater has full length sleeves, and a deep lace motif on the fronts and collar. This design is a good transitional garment from warm days to chilly evenings, and would fit perfectly in England’s potentially dreary days. Noro’s Tokonatsu is a cotton/silk/viscose blend that would create a perfect summer cardigan to cozy up in without overheating!

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Tulip Fields, by Dawn Catanzaro is a shawlette knit in garter stitch. With laceweight yarn and a deep diamond and zigzag border, an otherwise winter stitch becomes light and airy for summer evenings. We are dreaming of it knit up in Kettle Yarn Co. Beyul.

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The Violet Cap and Bonnet, by Melissa LaBarre is another example of a stitch pattern being used for slightly different pieces. The bonnet is sized for babies and children with a practical tie under the chin to stay on, while the cap is sized for adults. They would both be beautiful in Fyberspates Scruptious 4ply.

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Last but not least is the Wildflowers Cap by Mary Jane Mucklestone. If you have to wear a wooly cap in the summer, it might as well have flowers on it! We would choose two shades of Mondial Bio Lana for ours. And we might need it with the week that London is having at the moment!

There are many more craft projects in this issue to enjoy, we have just highlighted the knitting ones first. How to choose the next project!

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Yarn Pairings for PomPom Quarterly Issue 16

spring16-coverIt’s that time again! We have the latest issue of Pom Pom Quarterly in the shop and online. It’s a gorgeous issue, with a focus on stitch patterns and texture. In order to show these off all of the pieces have been knit in light neutrals from light grey through cream to white. 

spring16-3The first up is Delineate. Designed by Olga Buraya-Kefelian, this tank top has a classic and modest front, with an open work stitch pattern in the back that is somewhere between a mesh and lace. This is a great wardrobe basic that can be worn with trousers, skirts and shorts in any range of situations, from weekend trips to the market or holidays in the sun. We would knit it in one of our many shades of Debbie Bliss Eco-baby  , an organic cotton that is perfect worn next to the skin. Even better, we have it in a number of brand new shades, from neutral to bright! 

spring16-11Equilibrium is the lone cardigan of the collection, by Gina Röckenwagner. It features an unusual construction with increases and decreases, and hangs open at the front. The original is knit in the fantastic Manos del Uruguay Silk Blend DK, which we have in variegated shades in the shop. If you are looking for a colour that is closer to the original we would suggest Fyberspates Scrumptious DK

spring16-8Imitation is one of two crochet patterns in this issue, here designed by Judith Brand. These little mitts are perfect to keep in your purse for those surprise chilly mornings and hardly take up any wool or time to make! We would recommend Excelana 4ply for these beauties. 

spring16-5Perpendicular by Sarah Brunenberg is a generously sized triangle shawl. This shawl is perfect for someone who doesn’t like a lot of fussy lace, as it features a single panel of chevron stitches with garter stitch wings. Sulka Legato is one of our favourite yarns for a project like this one. The silk/alpaca combo has drape for wrapping around but enough stitch definition to make the lace and garter stitch sing. 

spring16-9A second pattern from Gina Röckenwagner, Rhombille is a perfect pullover sweater. Like many of the other patterns in this issue, it combines simple garter stitch with a bold stitch pattern. We recommend Erika Knight Vintage Wool for a classic, heart sweater that will hold its shape and show off the main pattern well. 

spring16-7Right Angle is another pullover, this time from Georgia Farrell. This simple t-shirt has an allover triangle stitch pattern, a boat neck and ribbed edging details. We would knit it up in Blacker Swan DK for crisp stitch definition and lots of colours to choose from. 

spring16-6Riveret is the second crochet pattern, designed by Merrian Holland. It has a great modern take on classic granny square techniques and a breezy summer feel. Blacker Yarn’s Lyonesse DK is a fantastic summer yarn, with a 50% wool, 50% linen blend that will keep you covered but not overheated. 

spring16-4Next up we have Striated, a double length infinity snood by Nicki Merrall. This snood has a provisional cast on, is knit as a scarf and then the two ends are grafted together. This otherwise simple accessory is a great place to use a truly special yarn, like Kettle Yarn Co’s Baskerville. This special UK wool/silk blend is carefully indigo dyed in Hastings. 

spring16-2Last but not least we have Unfold, by Yuliya Tkacheva, which is the third crochet project in this issue. It features a unique chevron pattern and would make a perfect wardrobe basic for all seasons. We would love to see it in one of the natural shades of Purl Alpaca Fine

What’s your favourite pattern from this issue? Anything ready to jump onto your needles?

Fibre Feature Fridays: Cotton

One of the hardest things about choosing a new project is deciding which yarn to use. We have lots of yarns in the shop that are great for summer and lightweight knits. Our Summer Top KAL is in full swing, so over the next few weeks we will feature different fibres that we carry and highlight what makes them good for summer knits to help you decide on what to use. Some will be familiar to you, some may be a surprise!

Our first fibre feature is cotton. Cotton is pretty well known for being a summer fabric. It is a plant fibre that is cool, soft and easy to clean. It has none of the ‘prickle’ factor that animal fibres can have, so it works equally well for those with skin sensitivities and for hot weather.

Unfortunately, cotton has a bit of a contentious place in the global fibre industry at the moment. Due to the high quantity of water and pesticides needed to make cotton grow on an industrial level, commercial cotton can have disastrous results for the environment. This is why we do everything we can to carry yarns that come from companies that ensure their cotton comes from ethical and environmentally friendly sources.

Debbie Bliss Eco Baby in solid colours

Debbie Bliss Eco Baby in solid colours

Eco Baby is hands down the most environmentally friendly cotton in the shop. Not only is it organically grown, it is also dyed with non-toxic dyes in recycled water to minimize the impact on the communities that produce the yarn. Debbie Bliss has ensured that the yarns are produced in a way that benefits the producers in other ways as well, the labour is fair trade as well. Eco Baby comes in a range of solid pastels, as well as variegated. Perfect to mix and match. Debbie Bliss’s Eco Baby and Eco Baby Print – a 100% certified organic and fair trade cotton.

Debbie Bliss Eco Baby Prints

Debbie Bliss Eco Baby Prints

We love our Manos yarns, and Serena is no exception. Manos del Uruguay is a non-profit social organization and a member of the World Fair Trade Organization. Since 1968, Manos has provided jobs for craftswomen living in Uruguay rural areas. The Manos mission is to eradicate poverty through sustainable economic growth and by enabling craftspeople to improve the quality of their craft products. Serena is a cotton and alpaca (yes! alpaca!) blend. The alpaca makes the yarn incredibly light, while the cotton makes it more appropriate for warm temperatures. We have 6 super sweet and summery colours in stock that range from pastel blue to bright pop orange. Manos Serena – 60% Baby Alpaca/40% Cotton.

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Manos del Uruguay Serena

Mirasol is another company that works directly with the communities that produce it, this time in the Munani region of Puno in Peru. A percentage of each yarn sale goes directly to help fund a remote school. We have a range of 12 brights and neutrals that are perfect for any sunny day. Mirasol Pima Kuri – 100% ethically produced Pima Cotton

Mirasol Yarn Collection Pima Kuri

Mirasol Yarn Collection Pima Kuri

What can’t you say about Noro?! This well established company from Japan ticks all the boxes. They are environmentally friendly, from the fibres to the dying, and boy to they know colour! Noro is personally involved with inspecting all aspects of production, from visiting the animal farms to checking the machinery used and keeping restrictions on the dye processes to maintain products that are as eco-friendly as possible. Between the unusual fibre combinations to the trademark long colour repeats, Noro is always recognizable on the shelf. We have Noro Kibou – 54% Cotton, 34% Wool, 12% Silk and Noro Tokonatsu – 40% Cotton 30% Silk 30% Viscose, in stock.

Noro Kibou

Noro Kibou

Noro Tokonatsu

Noro Tokonatsu

Colour can be a bit tricky with cotton, which is one reason we are happy to work with Wool and the Gang. We also know that their yarns are all ethically produced in partnership with small producers in Peru. Their Shiny Happy Cotton is produced with no use of pesticides and comes in over 20 shades! It’s hard to pick just one.  WATG Shiny Happy Cotton – 100% Cotton

Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton

Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton

Spring Flower Crochet Pattern

Spring is definitely in the air, and over at Knit with attitude we’ve been busy crocheting flowers for our Easter window display. I’m not quite sure what it is, but certain universal motifs like flowers, hearts and stars put a smile on most people’s faces. Surrounded by colourful flowers, we’ve sure had a few happy days at work. Those of you who follow my Instagram probably noticed, as I flooded my stream with pictures like these.

Easter Crochet Flowers

Crochet flowers are such versatile motifs, you can practically use them for anything whether you sew them up as a blanket, a scarf, a summer top or just use them as they are on their own as embellishments. Or, you can do what we did, make an egg!

Paper Mache Egg in the making

Egg in the window

By the way, the picture above of the finished egg is by Sanna King, who probably did half of these flowers helping me getting the egg ready for Easter, her Instagram is definitely worth a follow.

For the egg we made flowers in three different sizes using Debbie Bliss Eco Baby. Please note that these patterns use UK English terms, I’ve made a UK/US/Norwegian conversion chart you can use as reference.

Flowers

Small flowers in two colours

Rnd 1: Make magic ring, 8 dc in ring, join with sl st in first dc.
Rnd 2: ch 1, *dc in next stitch, ch 6, dc in same stitch, dc in next dc* repeat from* to * 3 times, omitting last 1 dc into next stitch, join with a sl st into the first ch.
Rnd 3: *Work 10 htr into first ch loop, dc in next dc* repeat from * to * join with a sl st to end. Cut yarn and fasten off.
Rnd 4: Attach contrast colour yarn to any dc between two petals. *Work 5 dc up one side of the petal, ch 1, work 5 dc down the other side of the petal, work 1 dc covering previous dcs between petals inserting the hook at bottom of dc from rnd 2* repeat from * to * 3 times. Join with a sl st to end. Cut yarn and fasten off.

Medium flowers in three colours

In first colour, Ch 6, sl st into 1st ch to form a ring.
Rnd 1: Ch 1, work 12 dc into ring, join with a sl st into 1st dc. Cut yarn and fasten off.
Rnd 2: Join a new colour into any dc, ch 1, work 1 dc into the same stitch, *work 1 dc into the next stitch, ch 8, 1 dc into the same stitch, work 1 dc into the next stitch, ch 1, 1 dc into the next stitch* repeat from * to * 3 times, omitting last 1 dc into the next stitch and join with a sl st into the first ch.
Rnd 3: *Work 16 tr into the ch loop, sl st into the 1-ch space of the previous round* repeat from * to * 3 times, join with a sl st to end. Cut yarn and fasten off.
Rnd 4: Attach third colour yarn to any dc between two petals.
*Work 8 dc up one side of the petal, ch 2, work 8 dc down the other side of the petal, work 1 dc into ch 1 space of round two* repeat from * to * 3 times, join with a sl st to end. Cut yarn and fasten off.

Flowers

The large flowers we made are the Hawaiian Flowers by Sarah London. Please visit her lovely blog, and if you fancy some Easter crochet she just released the cutest bunny pattern ever!

Happy Easter!

Window Egg