Yarn Pairings for Interpretations Vol. 6

The popular design duo of Veera Välimäki and Joji Locatelli have come together again for another super edition of Interpretations, now in it’s 6th volume! The Interpretations series is the work of two friends, one from Finland and the other from Argentina. Each volume is based around 6 words, these 6 words give the inspiration for 12 designs. The words inspiring this issue are: Courage, Glee, Silence, Rapture, Connection and Scale. Each designer producing a design inspired by each word. This issue has a textural monochrome feel, with large shawls that have extensive pattern repeats and cosy tops with a relaxed and comfy fit. Working with the same starting point, the identity of each designer can really shine through, bringing a unique twist and personality to each piece.

Interpretations-Vol-6-coverThere is something available from head to toe in this issue, so below I have taken a look at the designs and put together some yarn pairings.

Courage:

Interpretations-Vol-6-05The Moonquake Cowl by Veera Välimäki is a graphic brioche cowl. Who doesn’t love brioche? Giving you dynamic vertical stripes and making such a wonderful squishy fabric, perfect for accessories like this. Mixing it up, the brioche rib flips and in doing so the dominant colour flips. Perfect for playing with those high contrast yarns. This pattern calls for a Hedgehog Fibres, try in contrasting tones of Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles for a looser gauge knit.

Interpretations-Vol-6-07The Resolute Wrap by Joji Locatelli is a massive all over lace, arrow shaped shawl. Chevrons of a bold graphic lace repeat are broken repeatedly by a few rows of garter stitch. This gives structure and direction to the shape, while also anchoring the eye and avoiding an over saturation of pattern. This would look beautiful in the slightly variegated tones of Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply.

Glee:

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The Wintergate Beanie by Veera Välimäki is a compelling all over cabled design. Featuring large and small cables that intertwine. It is like a pocket sized cabled sweater with interesting shaping and intriguing pattern. Giving you the fun of a cabled project but without the marathon of a large garment. Knit in a sport weight, try Blue Sky Fibres Alpaca Sport, for a hug your head deserves.

Interpretations-Vol-6-04The Moonlight Socks by Joji Locatelli makes use of a strong graphic pattern repeat along the front. Complex without being too fussy, while also being interesting to knit. Knit in five different shades to create a faded design, with a great colour palette to choose from try picking a gradient from the selection of Coopknits Socks Yeah!

Silence:

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The Hidden Sweater by Veera Välimäki is a delight in monochrome textural work. The yoke doesn’t employ two colours for effect, but is drained of colour. Leaving the essence of a yoke behind. That doesn’t mean it’s boring, but instead is striking. The texture of the stitches are allowed to bring their own colour. Toped off by it’s relaxed fit and rolled neck, it is also comfy. Try the luscious softness of The Fibre Co. Cumbria.

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The Understated Sweater by Joji Locatelli is a classic example of Joji’s ability to make effortless and wearable pieces. The simple boxy low-cut top is the perfect layer over a shirt. It’s smart shape is highlighted by a modest rib detail along the shoulders. Try this in Fyberspates Vivacious DK.

Rapture:

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The Smoke and Amber Wrap by Veera Välimäki has the perfect name. Ribbons of cable fill this shawl, but they also change direction along their length. This creates a texture that beguiles the eye, taking it on a journey and losing it, like being lost in fog or not quite making out something through a haze of smoke. I would be tempted to knit this in Kettle Yarn Islington DK, it’s sheen would catch the light and highlight the cables beautifully.

Interpretations-Vol-6-06

The Ravishing Vest by Joji Locatelli is a graceful long cardigan. It’s elegant shaping would make the perfect layer over summer dresses, when the temperature cools in the evening. The sophisticated shaping is given form by textural stitches that change style at the waist, playing with the silhouette of the body. Knit in a sport weight merino/silk blend try it in Scrumptious 4ply/Sport.

Connection:

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The Frozen Fields Shawl by Veera Välimäki, like is namesake, has an air of the crisp frost that settles on the ground in the morning. Garter stitch ridges have a great effect here, becoming almost structural against the lace panel repeat. The lace itself separates, giving character and interest to the overall design. Knit in a subtle gradients of Ninapetrina Tynn Rosy Merino, a slightly heavier gauge but the colours are oh so perfect.

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The Community Tunic by Joji Locatelli features a bold yoke with strong graphic shapes, moving away from the traditions of a complicated pattern repeat. Simple yet bold the yoke gives this top a strong modern feel, without being austere. Long in the body it would make the perfect layer over leggings, what’s even better is it has pockets. Stylish yet practical. Try Hey Mama Wolf’s Schafwolle #03 for a sturdy practical top.

Scale:

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The Saltwater Coat by Veera Välimäki is a practical cardigan, making the perfect layer. Short oversized sleeves make this garment roomy while also stopping it being cumbersome. Knit in reversed stocking stitch, it makes use of the textural purl side and it also has a pair of good sized pockets. Knit the in this in the cosy Hillesvåg Blåne.

Interpretations-Vol-6-02The Evolve Shawl by Joji Locatelli is a texture lovers dream, while also having the joy of fading yarns in a harmonious way. A bold elongated triangle is made graphic by the triangle shaped stitch repeat, bringing subtle angles along its length. Between colours is an even bolder garter ridge striping which breaks the pattern repeats in a striking way. Knit like this in three distinct speckled monochrome colours, the end result is vivid and elegant. This design calls for the moody shades of Black Elephant Merino Singles.

This issue has a gentle feel, strong designs, but with a sensitivity. Colours are muted and understated and the pieces are wearable and practical. A lovely issue that I hope will inspire many creations.

Pattern Launch – The Delkash Dress

It is with great excitement, mixed in with a large dollop of nervousness, that I present to you my new design the Delkash Dress which we are launching at Edinburgh Yarn Festival next week.

-strikkinger-'s Delkash Dress

-strikkinger-‘s Delkash Dress

The Delkash Dress is a discretely fitted short dress with ¾ length sleeves worked in Stockinette Brioche. The inspiration for this design came to me as we were exhibiting at EYF 2018. A dear friend of mine and Brioche knitter extraordinaire, Siobhan, who so kindly came with us to help at our stand was wearing her gorgeous Brioche Askews Me Dress (a Stephen West design) while we were there, and she left not only me but basically the whole festival stunned – that dress is just so gorgeous!!! We had such a nice time at the festival, there was just so many delicious knits everywhere you looked, a feast for the eye, and we realised that planning your wardrobe is quite an essential part of preparing for a festival like this – and so we started dreaming up future projects to make in time for EYF 2019. (Natalie, Siobhan and I tried really hard to convince George that a knitted kilt had to happen, somehow this is yet to manifest itself…). With a complete dress envy – there was no question – I had to make a dress of my own.

Enel's Delkash Dress

Enel’s Delkash Dress

On our stand we had three of Garnsurr’s Søkke Merino greens hanging next to each other, I just could not get my eyes of them, together they just created the most amazing fade from a subtle earthy one to a fantastic acidy neon one, I just kept lusting after them – still they were a bit too crazy for me to be able to wear them unless I toned them down with a more neutral colour and I was drawn to the subtle shades of Fyberspates’ Vivacious 4ply. Now – this is what I absolutely love with Brioche – the possibilities for combining colours successfully are just endless. Also a few years ago I discovered the Stockinette Brioche and I found it to be just a brilliant stitch, I started off using it for a pair of leg warmers that didn’t turn out quite right colour-wise and was quickly deemed for frogging, but ever since I’ve been wanting to use it in a design – I just had to come up with the right one. Like the more known ribbed Brioche Knitting, the Stockinette Brioche is an exciting way to work Brioche stitches – the main difference is that it creates a smoother fabric with slightly less drape and more hold than Brioche Rib Knitting – perfect for a knitted dress – as soon as the idea about a dress hit me I knew I wanted to do it in Stockinette Brioche.

cm8032's Delkash Dress

cm8032’s Delkash Dress

Now the thing with Brioche knitting in general is that you always use smaller needles than what your yarn weight indicates, this is due to the size of the stitches produced, so even though you use smaller needles the gauge equals the one indicated for your yarn weight. So your project will grow according to yarn weight and not according to needle size, just saying in case any of you are already intimidated by the thought of such a needle size. If someone told me, say 10 years ago, that I would be knitting a dress on 3mm needles I would have laughed out loud – but here I was, starting off my project using tiny needles, that’s what happens when you fall in love with an idea.

Osloknitter's Delkash Dress

Osloknitter’s Delkash Dress

October last year I was ready to show the dress off to the world for the first time, and decided to wear it at the London yarn festival Yarnporium. It became obvious to me that the dress was a hit, and the decision to make it into a published pattern was made, so as soon as the festival was over I made a call out for test knitting, and seriously have my test knitters done a truly amazing job!!! One thing though – I am tiny, yes I know – and the one comment from when wearing the dress at the festival that really got to me was “Well you can wear it for sure, with such a tiny body, but I could never wear a fitted dress like that”. I did not design a dress for petite women, I designed a dress with the intention of making anyone that wore it feel gorgeous! Throughout the test knitting process this was an ongoing discussion – how do we make sure the quality of the instructions are just as accommodating for the larger sizes as it is for the small ones. What we found is that standardised sizing guide lines assumes that a larger size equals a taller person – which often is not the case. In the pattern we’ve made sure you can adjust the size to fit your height as well as your bust/waist size. The result is a pattern graded for 8 sizes ranging from bust size 78cm to 114.5cm.

Copperlili's Delkash Dress

Copperlili’s Delkash Dress

Bringing the Delkash Dress to Edinburgh Yarn Festival to be launched there seems like the apt thing to do, it feels like bringing it home – back to the origin of the ideas and emotions behind it. There is no denying that the Delkash Dress (named by the wonderful women of Garnsurr, meaning attractive!) is to this date my most ambitious project and it feels rather scary letting it out in the world, but I’m also very proud of the result we have achieved – and so without further ado I present to you The Delkash Dress! All details are up on its Ravelry page – it is available to buy from us at our stand at Edinburgh Yarn Festival – and will become available on Ravelry March 25th. Please check out the instagram hashtags #delkashdress and #kwatestknittersteam to see more amazing versions of the dress from my test knitters!

MayaB's Delkash Dress

MayaB’s Delkash Dress

Trio Shawl KAL Round-Up and winners!

I was looking for a new shawl project when Strikkelisa’s Trio Shawl popped up on my Instagram feed and I immediately knew is was the perfect one for me. Large, super wearable and comfy, like a hug thought the day! I loved the simple yet interesting construction, but best of it all – the Trio Shawl can be customised and adjusted in all sorts of ways and it can be knit in any yarn really, so it opens up for experimenting and breaking the traditional ‘rules’ and you all know that I am always up for breaking the rules.

Maya's Trio Shawl

Maya’s Trio Shawl

I was so excited to see that so many chose to join me in my new project, and oh my – just look at some of the lovely results!!! (Also check out the hashtag #trioshawlkal, #triosjal and #trioshawl for other versions and inspirations).

Judypam's Trio Shawl

Judypam’s Trio Shawl

Hollo06's Trio Shawl.

Hollo06’s Trio Shawl.

Hollo06's Trio Shawl.

GeorgeJulian’s Trio Shawl.

Yarntogarment's Trio Shawl.

Yarntogarment’s Trio Shawl.

Nigardlien's Trio Shawl.

Nigardlien’s Trio Shawl.

CatarinaLobato's Trio Shawl.

CatarinaLobato’s Trio Shawl.

You might remember that I promised a few prizes that could be won as well…

Randomly drawn from those who joined in and finished by February 20th the winners are *drumroll*                                                                                                                                 Hollo06 won 3 patterns of choice from Strikkelisa with an accompanying yarn pack from Knit with attitude for one of those patterns.                                                                   Yarntogarment won 3 patterns of choice from Strikkelisa and a refund of her purchase from Knit with attitude.

Could the two of you have a little browse through Strikkelisa’s English patterns and drop me an email to maya(at)knitwithattitude(dot)com letting me know which ones you chose and I’ll let you know how to proceed choosing colours for the yarn pack and details for the refund. Congratulations!