What Maya and George Knits! – Summer Light

You may have seen our designer feature on Julie Knits in Paris on the blog earlier. Looking at some fun colourful projects to see you into the summer and beyond. Well the trouble with writing these inspiration posts, is the inspiration seeps out and gets us excited. Then this happens….. We knit the same project! The wall of Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace was calling us and who could resist a one skein project. So here we go!

Summer Light is a lightweight summer tee. Knit in lighter than air Kidsilk Lace. Quick to knit on 5mm needles with some added Merino Single 4ply for the ribbing.

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‘I always complain about the lack of knitting time in my life – and how I never seem to able to finish something – but seriously… I did the Summer Light in less than a week!!! Such a fun project it literarily flew off the needles, and using less than one hank of Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace, this top does not look cheap, I mean the fibres are luxurious indeed, but cost wise I’m absolutely over the moon! I wanted a bright look similar to the original design and chose the colour Monarch, I found the perfect match for the ribbing using Black Elephant Minis in Lazy Days. Unlike George, I went for the cropped look, and like George I chose the smallest size. I didn’t get around to wash and block the top before we took the pictures, so I’m hoping it will grow a little when I get around to it – still it is very comfortable and can be worn as is. My only problem now is that I don’t have anything in my wardrobe to go with a cropped top, an empire waist summer dress is currently on the top of the wish list.’ – Maya

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‘I decided to knit Summer Light as I’ve always wanted to have a go at knitting with a single strand of Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace. I’ve done some double stranded marled projects but never really tried it this way. Plus a project that uses less than 50g of yarn, but still makes a garment, well what else can give you that! I wanted it as a layer over a shirt or t-shirt, as something extra to put on when the weather cools slightly. I have to say I really enjoyed knitting it. Super quick, with blissfully easy raglan increases and no second sleeve syndrome! I knit the smallest size and only adjustment I made was to knit it longer in the body, I didn’t quite fancy a crop top and wanted more of a t-shirt vibe. I love the end result. I used some yarn pulled from my stash to match against the Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace, I chose the colour Parklife.’ – George

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Yarn Pairings for Pom Pom 29

A summer issue of Pom Pom is always a joy. Reminding us that just because the weather is warming up, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be reaching for our needles and hooks. Nine designs fill this issue, inspired by ceramic tiles, terracotta, and sand. Think warmth; earthy and organic, also splashes of colour and pattern repeats. Some light and airy summer tops and essential wardrobe staples for the warmer months. There is even a gorgeous crochet bag! Perfect for trips to the beach.

pom-pom-issue-29-cover-kwaThis is a bumper issue, with more pages, more photographs and larger typeface. Featuring designs by Amy Christoffers, Sari Nordlund, Soraya Garciá, Isa Cateoillán, Clare Lakewood, Josée Paquine, Marjorie Martin, Rachael Reese and Stephanie Earp. An interview with Emi Ito, as well as other craft projects, project bag tutorial by artist Arrounna Khounnoraj of Bookhou. As well as a recipe from Rebecca Lawrence’s for Maple Bourbon Fudge. Phew!

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Argil by Clare Lakewood – Argil screams summer! Light airy and quite simply stunning. A perfect layer over a summer top, or worn just on its own for a trip the the seaside. A clever use of stripes add a dynamic edge and the tied off front an informal touch.  Worked flat beginning at the back, divided at the neck and rejoined at the front. These stop half way down the body. You then work the front in halves working towards the middle, seamed with a 3 needled cast off. Knit in a 4ply, in a wool silk blend, combined with a linen. I love the idea of these two textures. For the linen I would go for Växbo Lingarn and for the silk blend what about Kettle Yarn Beyul. Of course if you wanted to stick completely with plant fibres you could substitute the Beyul for Nuturing Fibres Eco-Lush. The blend of cotton and bamboo would echo the matte and glossy texture of the wool and silk.

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Earthen by Amy Christoffers – I’m getting Art Deco vibes from this cardigan. A simple but very effective all over fan pattern repeat, giving texture and structure. Lets face it the summer is not always sunny and a welcome cardigan is definitely one to have. I particularly like the way the fan pattern falls into the rib. The body is worked in one piece and the sleeves worked separately and later seamed. Worked in a cosy DK merino I would try Fyberspates Vivacious DK, is anyone else thinking the Blush colour-way for this?

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Faience by Soraya García – I really like the construction of this piece. It’s so simple but so effective. It’s worked completely flat. Starting at the back, you then divide for the neck and work the two fronts separately. You pick up for a rib around the neck and down the front, then seamlessly join the fronts with a 3 needle bind off. You pick up stitches either side and echo the ribbing, you then join the back and front with a crochet slip stitch up to the arm holes. Genius! A simple all over pattern repeat adds symmetry and style. Why not push the boat out with this one and knit it in From the Mountain Cashmere, you will never want to take it off.

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Minton by Isa Catepillán – You may remember Isa for being the crochet superstar from the last issue of Pompom, well she is back and worked her crochet magic once again. A stunner of a bag made up of 12 identical square motifs. A classy way of toting around your swimwear or for the elegant grocery shop. A good sturdy fibre is needed for this project so choose Växbo Lingarn .

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Ogee by Sari Nordlund – This sleeveless top is a texture lovers dream. Worked in one piece with an allover pattern. Travelling twisted stitches and scallop lace go together to make this simple shaped garment, a work of art. Cleverly reversible, with either a higher neckline worn at the back or front. Perfect for throwing on in a hurry. Knit in a cotton blend I would be tempted to knit this in Nuturing Fibres Eco-Lush or Eco-Fusion.

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Rievaulx by Josée Paquin – A lovely checkerboard of intarsia in a simply shaped tee. Worked completely flat, allowing you to get absorbed by the pattern. Sleeves are picked up around the arm hole and also worked flat with short row shaping. Finally the side seams are joined and ta-da! I would definitely go for Socks Yeah 4ply for this, with such a range of colours that work wonderfully together, you will be spoilt for choice.

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Rookwood by Rachael Reese – You may be knitting for summer but you still need shawls right?! A welcome layer to drape around the shoulders to shield from the sun, or give a little warmth if it gets cool. Simple panels of garter stitch are broken up with seafoam lace. A delightful lace stitch that plays with light in such a charming way. A nice sized triangular shape will carry you through to autumn as well. Knit in a no nylon sock yarn, well I would have to recommend Hey Mamma Wolf Sockyarn #04.

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Sanctuary by Stephanie Earp – The pattern repeat on this top is gorgeous and really runs with the theme. Little tile repeats radiate from the yoke of this top down worked in the round tee. The simple wide neck will make it a cool edition to your wardrobe but also stylish. Knit in a 4ply cotton blend, tey again either Nuturing Fibres Eco-Lush or Eco-Fusion.

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Tesserae by Marjorie Martin – A one piece circular yoked top, knitted in the from the top down. Using a mosaic pattern to great effect. Alternating 2 colours every other row, with a combination of slipped stitches. An attractive creature that finishes it off are the Latvian braids. I love the vibrant pattern of this one, a great opportunity to go wild with colour. Choose some nice contrasting colours and make the pattern vibrate. Knit in a wool silk blend Kettle Yarn Beyul might work well here, giving you a truly luxurious feel.

I really like this issue, I think it is a very strong theme to work with and there are some great summer wardrobe staples. Dream of the sun and get knitting!

New Yarn: Nurturing Fibres – Eco-Lush

There has been a lot of love for plant fibres lately here at Knit With Attitude. I think we are getting excited about summer and dreaming of all those outdoor knitting days. Also what is more exciting than introducing a new yarn! So here we go…. Nurturing Fibres Eco-Lush. A unique bamboo and cotton yarn from Nurturing Fibres.

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Nurturing Fibres is an Eco-friendly yarn range, hand dyed near Cape Town by Carle Dehning and her team. Nurturing fibres strive to conserve as much energy and waste during their production process. They make use of borehole water that is heated by solar power for their dye baths. After dyeing, the PH levels in the dyebaths are neutralized and the water is used to irrigate an olive grove near the dye studio. Their whole production process, from receiving the spun yarn, is done by hand.

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Eco-Lush is a 4ply 40% Bamboo and 60% Cotton yarn plied together with a cotton strand and a bamboo one. The quality of these two fibres bring something unique to the yarn. The cotton is matte in texture and provides a slightly muted base for the dye. The bamboo on the other hand is glossy, with sheen and takes the dye in a much brighter and more vibrant way. The bamboo adds a bright flash to this yarn that catches the light in a pleasing way. This yarn has good body and weight, will drape well, be cool and perfect for summer items.

Lets take a look at some projects that would look great knit up in Eco-Lush, by focusing on simple summer tees:
eco-lush091Edie by Isabell Kraemer is a simple t-shirt worked from the top down with raglan increases. Interest is given by textural stripes. This top will look stunning in the blend of Eco-Lush. The simplicity of it highlighting the yarns qualities.

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Waterlily by Meghan Fernandes. This charming top is not only pretty but also cool. A lacey leaf panel around the neck, which extends to the top of the capped sleeves. Worked from the bottom up in one piece, for the perfect seamless knitting. There is even a Latvian braid that marks the transition into the lace pattern.

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Linum Tee by Bristol Ivy. The very graphic shape of this top enhances its lightness. Made for a drapey yarn and perfect for Eco-Lush. An angular fisherman’s rib panel, top’s off the design and gives a bit of flair.

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Walk Along by AnkeStrick is an intriguing two colour design which creates the illusion of two tops in one. Perfect if you can’t decide on just one colour! The top is worked seamlessly from top down with a wide raglan shape that carries down the body. A flattering and practical piece.

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Folded by Veera Välimäki. With a wide round neck for non stifling summer comfort, this top is stylish and cool. Pleats at the centre front add a nice design detail, but also help highlight and give interest to the shape.

So here we have some inspiring designs for summer tees and the perfect projects for the new Eco-Lush.

Yarn Feature: The Fibre Co. – Meadow

The Fibre Co’s Yarn of the Month for May is Meadow. So what better way to shed some light on this gorgeous yarn, than a Yarn Feature. The Fibre Co are well know for creating interesting fibre blends and Meadow is no exception. A blend of 40% Merino Wool, 25% Baby Llama, 20% Silk, 15% Linen. The Merino and Baby Llama provide softness and bounce, the Silk sheen and drape, and the Linen a crisp hand and lovely stitch definition. Perfection!

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The Fibre Co began in 2003 in an old warehouse on the working waterfront of Portland, Maine, USA. Founded by Daphne Marinopoulos, they began with a small spinning mill, lots of raw natural fibre and a vision of creating yarns that she couldn’t find on the retail shelves. Now based in the UK the Fibre Co have become a global brand, working with a variety of producers and artisans.

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A detail of Fairy Mist by Knitted Bliss.

The Fibre Co describe Meadow as ‘Rustic Luxury’, inspired by the eco system of meadows. How they house local fauna and serve as a fertile growing ground for flora of many varieties. Meadows are usually filled with grasses and other non-woody plants so have a feeling of lightness, which lends itself perfectly to this beautiful lace weight yarn.

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The fibre blend creates and interesting texture and the dying process has given a compelling play of colour throughout the skien. It’s fibrous, but soft and will add a nice heathered texture to your projects. Earthy but sumptuous.

Spun into a 2 ply yarn that’s slightly heavier than a typical lace weight yarn. This blend of fibres creates a versatile yarn able to work on a wide range of projects and over a variety of needle sizes. Made and dyed in Peru, these 100g skeins have 498m / 545yds per skien, with a tension of: 32–36sts over 10cm / 4″ and a recommended needle size of between 2.25cm-3.25mm.

Lets take a look at a few patterns that give justice to this super yarn:

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Summer Meadow by Janina Kallio is a simple easy to knit shawl that will celebrate the yarn, while not complicating it with fussy details. Textured garter stitch is offset with eyelet rows on stocking stitch. The lightness of Meadow will make this the perfect elegant layer.

meadow06Planting Seeds by Helen Stewart is the project for those who can’t decide on one colour. Knit in three skiens of Meadow, bold and graphic but with a lightness from the yarn. Slipped stitches add interest here and create an interesting interplay with the other colours.

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Huia by Libby Jonson is a luxurious, light cardigan with pretty lace details. A go to layer, that is smart, while also being relaxed. No picking up for the bands, the edge detail is worked with the body.

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Fluted by Cecily Glowik MacDonald, is a simple cardigan that showcases this yarn. Worked seamlessly, top down and uncomplicated. The smallest of details are provided by the Art Deco-esque designs on the collar.

I hope this post has inspired you to take a look at this fabulous fibre blend and made you think about giving lace weight knitting a go.

Plant Fibres! Knits for Summer

It is known that us knitters like to knit all year round, come rain or shine. But when the sun is shining what yarns do we reach for. Plant Fibres of course! Plant fibres offer us a cooler alternative and provide a vegan option for those who would prefer to not use, or have allergies to animal fibres. With a variety of textures and properties to choose from, plant fibres can give you drape, structure, sheen, softness and versatility. Plus they are easy to care for and can take more of a beating than some of our more delicate woollens. Great for those summer garments or children’s clothes.

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Here at Knit With Attitude we have various different plant fibres as well as plant fibre and wool blends. In this post I am going to focus on Växbo Lin Lingarn and Nuturing Fibres in Eco-Cotton, Eco-Fushion and Eco-Bamboo.

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First up is Växbo Lin Lingarn. Lingarn is a 100% natural pure linen yarn traditionally grown and spun in Sweden. Växbo Lin’s Lingarn is certified with the Swedish Good Environmental Choice label (Bra Miljöval) because of its durability and environmentally friendly processing.

The earliest trace of flax culture in the Swedish county Hälsingland is dated to circa 200 AD. Evidence from the Viking age indicates that women wore linen chemises under their woolen skirts. Flax has been grown for domestic use throughout Sweden. In medieval times there was a surplus of flax in Hälsingland and linen became an item of trade. In fact, linen rather than money was used to pay taxes and fines.

Heres a little bit about how linen fibre is made from one of our earlier Fibre Fridays posts. ‘Linen comes from a plant called flax. Unlike cotton, where the fibre comes from a pod that the plant produces, linen is made from the inner stalk. This type of fibre is called a bast fibre. Other bast fibres include nettle, hemp and rattan. The plant is grown to a height of about 4 feet. When it is ready, the plants are pulled up from the roots and left to decompose in a process called retting. This unbinds the unwanted outer bark from the inner bark that makes the fibre. The two types of bark are separated by big metal rollers in a process called scutching. The fibre lengths are combed to find the longest fibres which are then spun into thread or yarn.’

Linen is a tough fibre that may feel stiff an unyielding at first, but the more you work it the more it softens. It is recommended winding linen by hand, as this begins the softening process, which continues the more you work with it.

Linen is great for summer garments. It holds it’s shape well and is light and airy. Providing a cool and breathable layer. Here are a couple ideas to get you started:

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Mirabeau by Natalie Selles is an attractive striped summer top with a fetching lace panel. Idea for summer holidays and evenings dining al fresco. Light and cool, with fun Breton stripes, allowing you an opportunity to play with colour.

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Fiore di Lino by Regina Moessmer is a simple summer top with the added flair of lacey details around hem and cuffs. Worked seamlessly from the top down you can add more or less lace as you prefer.

Next up is Nurturing Fibres Eco-Cotton. This DK weight cotton with a good twist, good definition and a dreamy palette of hand dyed colours. Nurturing Fibres is an Eco-friendly yarn range, hand dyed near Cape Town by Carle Dehning and her team. Nurturing fibres strive to conserve as much energy and waste during their production process. They make use of borehole water that is heated by solar power for their dye baths. After dyeing, the PH levels in the dyebaths are neutralized and the water is used to irrigate an olive grove near the dye studio. Their whole production process, from receiving the spun yarn, is done by hand.

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Cotton is perfect for summer wear, accessories, children’s clothes, blankets and more. Here are a couple for inspiration:

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Razzle Summer Poncho by Noma Ndlovu is a gorgeous open lace work poncho. This would make a great light and airy layer over a t-shirt. Knit on larger needles in a simple two row lace repeat, it will be speedy as well as straightforward. Buttons on the sides are a nice edition for closing.

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Colour Block Shawl by Noma Ndlovu is a great way of indulging in a few colours. This easy to knit garter stitch shawl is knit using 5 colours. Create your perfect fade or just pick your favourites and let the beauty of this hand dyed yarn sing.

Last but not least we have Nurturing Fibres Eco-Bamboo and Eco-Fusion. I have grouped these two together because they are the same weight so are really interchangeable. Eco-Bamboo is a 100% Bamboo Fibre where the Eco-Fusion is a 50/50 blend of Bamboo and Cotton. The Eco-Bamboo and Eco-Fusion have the same principles of the other Nuturing Fibres yarns. Hand dyed, eco friendly and with an aim to conserve as much energy and waste during their production process..

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Bamboo has an amazing sheen, it almost glows as it catches the light. The Eco-Bamboo has a good twist which helps it hold its shape and this means it will sag less than usual bamboo. Eco-Fusion plays with the bamboo and cottons qualities, plying a matte yarn against a glossy one to give an interesting texture to your knit wear.

Here is some information on Bamboo production from our earlier Fibre Fridays post: ‘Bamboo especially has been heralded as the new natural wonder fibre due to it’s renewability as a plant, but it’s journey from farm to knitting needles is not without it’s pitfalls. There is no denying that the process of producing these yarns is a chemical one. The fibres are broken down with sodium hydroxide and carbon disulphide into a viscose cellulose solution, which is then pushed through spinnerets. The fibre then solidifies into the fibre that can then be spun into yarn. Luckily, with newer technology this system is quoted as being a 99% closed loop system, where the chemicals are recycled and re-used for each batch of fibre.’

Bamboo offers a really cool to the touch quality, silky with good drape. Perfect for knitting and crochet projects. Here I have found a couple of crochet ones which I find inspiring:

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Summer Rebel by Brenda Grobler is a go to summer top. Wide in the neck for a relaxed fit. The crochet stitch adding a cooling mesh fabric.

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Flower Stole by Yuli Nilssen is a gorgeous crochet wrap. Perfect for draping over your shoulders on those cooler summer nights. Featuring an attractive flower pattern repeat it has a graphic play with light and shadow.

I hope these summer suggestions have you dreaming of hot days and given you some food for thought when it comes to plant fibres.

 

Time for a New Project – Colour! – Inspiration from Julie Knits in Paris

As spring is looking like it has finally sprung and the sun is shining, we are starting to dream of those summer projects. Something with a burst of colour to drag us out of winter. When I think of colour I instantly think of Julie Dubreux of Julie Knits in Paris. Her energy and enthusiasm is infectious and her joie de vivre unparalleled. Who wouldn’t want some of that in their life! Well lets conjure up some of this magic from the shelves at Knit with attitude and get inspired. I have pulled out some tempting patterns that will take you through spring and into the summer months. I have gone for some of her exciting jumper patterns, with a variety of techniques, that all employ colour on a grand scale. I have also put together some yarn suggestions to get you started.

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First up is Gaudi, this is one for adding a bit of colour-work sparkle to your wardrobe. A layer for early spring perhaps? When the days flip from being mild to unpredictably cold and grey, you need this jumper. Inspired by the colourful architecture of Antonio Gaudí. The mosaic covered Park Güell or the stained glass windows in La Sagrada Família all shine through. Have fun with colour in this project. Imagine the yoke like a multicoloured mosaic piece and pick a yarn that has a lot of colour, to create the look of small tiles jostled together. Also a nice contrast will give you the feeling of light, as if it’s streaming through a stained glass window.

Knit seamlessly from the top down in a 4ply. Here is some inspiration to get you started:

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The main colour provided by the deep Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock in Wish set against the bright and varied Garnsurr Søkke Merino in Kjeta. This pairing will make the Garnsurr pop and there is enough variety over the skein to give you that stained glass / mosaic look.

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This Garnsurr pairing goes for a more striking contrast. Everyone loves grellow right? The subtle speckles across all the skeins will give an even overall texture. The yellow will pop against the grey creating a really luminescent yoke. Garnsurr Søkke Merino in Grytleflaks #10 and Sneivin.

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A more muted combination here but with the essence of light and dark. The Garnsurr Søkke Merino Tomreipes as the contrast colour has the essence of sun bleached tiles, with the mere hint of a muted speckle. Against this earthy purple of the Garnsurr Søkke Merino in Krilla it is quite striking.

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The dark purple and green colours of this Garnsurr Søkke Merino in Tesu are perfect for a garden inspired mosaic, with hints of moss and lichen growing. Such a rich colour needs something bright to offset it like this Hedgehog Fibres Twist Sock in Crystal.

summer-colour-pattern-02Taking us into spring is this light, short sleeved masterwork of brioche. It’s the Pörkenäs, perfect for a spring layer, or an extra on a cool summer evening. Julie says she has designed this top for brioche beginners and the repeating motifs employ the simplest of increases and decreases. Worked in the round and top down, it is seamless and reversible. Ooh the joys of brioche, two garments in one! Brioche is such a squishy plump fabric that you know this one is going to be flattering, knit with negative ease for a comfortable fit.

This one is knit in a selection of 4ply merino singles. Choose complimentary ones, or go wild with some contrasts. Speckles mixed with solids would also give great effect to the brioche stitch, as well as yarns with three distinct tones, to bring depth to the finished piece.  Hedgehog fibres Skinny Singles and Black Elephant Merino Singles are a perfect choice. We will be getting all the new colours from Hedgehog Fibre in Skinny Singles which are up for pre-order on our website if you are after something different!

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A Hedgehog Fibre Skinny Singles combination in Method, Pistachio and Beach Bunny. I tried to keep the essence of Julie’s original with this combination. Having a dark blue offset with a light, then with nods of purple. A fresh watery combination.

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This rich red combination uses Black Elephant Merino Singles and Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Monarch and Plump. I thought the two dark reds needed a lightness to bounce off. Monarch works perfectly here I think, keeping it in a similar family but adding a paler peachy note. The speckles also sit nicely along side the more solid plump to great effect.

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Speckles across the board! Black Elephant Merino Singles in Knights of Cydonia and Arlandria and Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Hawk. Hawk is just one of those wild ones I love and some how I think it works as anchor here. Muted beiges lending themselves to the greens, while pinks and blues nod to the purples. This combo would be so exciting to knit and to wear.

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Warmth and heart with this combination. Here are some of my favourites. Black Elephant Merino Singles in Lazy Days and Little Miss Sunshine and Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Seed. These colours play so nicely together, certainly one to be wearing on the run up to summer. Seed will add a great contrast making the brioche stitches pop.

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When summer hits and you still want that piece of go to knit wear in your wardrobe, then this is for you. Summer Light is a lightweight summer tee. Knit in lighter than air Kidsilk Lace. I absolutely love this one and think it would look great over a shirt for a pop of colour. Quick to knit on 5mm needles its definitely one you can have finished in time for summer. The pattern is given a bit of weight by a merino single ribbing but this piece will be oh so light. Ok we’ll not quite lighter than air but just a 50g skein of mohairs worth.

Grab a skein of mohair and a merino single for the ribbing and you will be set.

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Peachy! This combination has Peach Belini’s written all over it. This tropical delight is perfect for an afternoon of sipping your favourite cocktails. Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace in Monarch and a couple of Black Elephant Mini’s in Pineapple Express, perfection.

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This is a combination I would go for, I’m always a sucker for green. The earthy to bright tones of Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace in Parklife sit wonderfully next to Black Elephant Mini’s in Arlandria. Garden party anyone?

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If you are going to go bright, go bright! Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace in Pinky Swear has got to be one of the brightest. I’m imaging this one gracefully over a white top, as the neon pink of the Kidsilk fizzes in the sunlight. Offset that with the richness of Black Elephant Mini’s in Moulin Rouge. For that cherry red on top of the cake.

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A little poolside number for those summer holidays. Create a graceful breezy top in Hedgehog Fibres Kidsilk Lace in Bubble with Black Elephant Mini’s in Tranquility. One for the lovers of blue, but there is still plenty going on in the Bubble to keep you interested.

So as the weather warms up there is no excuse not to be knitting, there is a fun and exciting colourful project for you for any weather!

Yarn Pairings for Interpretations Vol. 6

The popular design duo of Veera Välimäki and Joji Locatelli have come together again for another super edition of Interpretations, now in it’s 6th volume! The Interpretations series is the work of two friends, one from Finland and the other from Argentina. Each volume is based around 6 words, these 6 words give the inspiration for 12 designs. The words inspiring this issue are: Courage, Glee, Silence, Rapture, Connection and Scale. Each designer producing a design inspired by each word. This issue has a textural monochrome feel, with large shawls that have extensive pattern repeats and cosy tops with a relaxed and comfy fit. Working with the same starting point, the identity of each designer can really shine through, bringing a unique twist and personality to each piece.

Interpretations-Vol-6-coverThere is something available from head to toe in this issue, so below I have taken a look at the designs and put together some yarn pairings.

Courage:

Interpretations-Vol-6-05The Moonquake Cowl by Veera Välimäki is a graphic brioche cowl. Who doesn’t love brioche? Giving you dynamic vertical stripes and making such a wonderful squishy fabric, perfect for accessories like this. Mixing it up, the brioche rib flips and in doing so the dominant colour flips. Perfect for playing with those high contrast yarns. This pattern calls for a Hedgehog Fibres, try in contrasting tones of Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles for a looser gauge knit.

Interpretations-Vol-6-07The Resolute Wrap by Joji Locatelli is a massive all over lace, arrow shaped shawl. Chevrons of a bold graphic lace repeat are broken repeatedly by a few rows of garter stitch. This gives structure and direction to the shape, while also anchoring the eye and avoiding an over saturation of pattern. This would look beautiful in the slightly variegated tones of Fyberspates Vivacious 4ply.

Glee:

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The Wintergate Beanie by Veera Välimäki is a compelling all over cabled design. Featuring large and small cables that intertwine. It is like a pocket sized cabled sweater with interesting shaping and intriguing pattern. Giving you the fun of a cabled project but without the marathon of a large garment. Knit in a sport weight, try Blue Sky Fibres Alpaca Sport, for a hug your head deserves.

Interpretations-Vol-6-04The Moonlight Socks by Joji Locatelli makes use of a strong graphic pattern repeat along the front. Complex without being too fussy, while also being interesting to knit. Knit in five different shades to create a faded design, with a great colour palette to choose from try picking a gradient from the selection of Coopknits Socks Yeah!

Silence:

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The Hidden Sweater by Veera Välimäki is a delight in monochrome textural work. The yoke doesn’t employ two colours for effect, but is drained of colour. Leaving the essence of a yoke behind. That doesn’t mean it’s boring, but instead is striking. The texture of the stitches are allowed to bring their own colour. Toped off by it’s relaxed fit and rolled neck, it is also comfy. Try the luscious softness of The Fibre Co. Cumbria.

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The Understated Sweater by Joji Locatelli is a classic example of Joji’s ability to make effortless and wearable pieces. The simple boxy low-cut top is the perfect layer over a shirt. It’s smart shape is highlighted by a modest rib detail along the shoulders. Try this in Fyberspates Vivacious DK.

Rapture:

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The Smoke and Amber Wrap by Veera Välimäki has the perfect name. Ribbons of cable fill this shawl, but they also change direction along their length. This creates a texture that beguiles the eye, taking it on a journey and losing it, like being lost in fog or not quite making out something through a haze of smoke. I would be tempted to knit this in Kettle Yarn Islington DK, it’s sheen would catch the light and highlight the cables beautifully.

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The Ravishing Vest by Joji Locatelli is a graceful long cardigan. It’s elegant shaping would make the perfect layer over summer dresses, when the temperature cools in the evening. The sophisticated shaping is given form by textural stitches that change style at the waist, playing with the silhouette of the body. Knit in a sport weight merino/silk blend try it in Scrumptious 4ply/Sport.

Connection:

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The Frozen Fields Shawl by Veera Välimäki, like is namesake, has an air of the crisp frost that settles on the ground in the morning. Garter stitch ridges have a great effect here, becoming almost structural against the lace panel repeat. The lace itself separates, giving character and interest to the overall design. Knit in a subtle gradients of Ninapetrina Tynn Rosy Merino, a slightly heavier gauge but the colours are oh so perfect.

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The Community Tunic by Joji Locatelli features a bold yoke with strong graphic shapes, moving away from the traditions of a complicated pattern repeat. Simple yet bold the yoke gives this top a strong modern feel, without being austere. Long in the body it would make the perfect layer over leggings, what’s even better is it has pockets. Stylish yet practical. Try Hey Mama Wolf’s Schafwolle #03 for a sturdy practical top.

Scale:

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The Saltwater Coat by Veera Välimäki is a practical cardigan, making the perfect layer. Short oversized sleeves make this garment roomy while also stopping it being cumbersome. Knit in reversed stocking stitch, it makes use of the textural purl side and it also has a pair of good sized pockets. Knit the in this in the cosy Hillesvåg Blåne.

Interpretations-Vol-6-02The Evolve Shawl by Joji Locatelli is a texture lovers dream, while also having the joy of fading yarns in a harmonious way. A bold elongated triangle is made graphic by the triangle shaped stitch repeat, bringing subtle angles along its length. Between colours is an even bolder garter ridge striping which breaks the pattern repeats in a striking way. Knit like this in three distinct speckled monochrome colours, the end result is vivid and elegant. This design calls for the moody shades of Black Elephant Merino Singles.

This issue has a gentle feel, strong designs, but with a sensitivity. Colours are muted and understated and the pieces are wearable and practical. A lovely issue that I hope will inspire many creations.

Yarn Pairings for Pom Pom Quarterly Issue 28 – Spring 2019

It’s really starting to feel like spring might not be that far away, here in London. The sun is shining and it feels unusually mild. What better way to celebrate this feeling, than delving into the latest spring issue of Pom Pom. Aptly themed for this time of year, this issue is ‘The Botanical Issue’. Designers were given the theme of flora, looking to nature and plant forms for their inspiration.

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So we have nine knitting and crochet patterns, plus articles and recipes. All exploring the botanical theme. I’ve put together some yarn pairings from the shelves of Knit With Attitude, so lets take a look at these natural wonders!

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Sweetfern by Liza Laird and Kate Madden is a cute slouchy brioche hat. Taking the characteristic use of two colours that brioche offers, while also bringing in stitch shaping for that natural leafy vibe. A trailing vine motif runs from the rib to the crown creating a bold and graphic design. Choose two contrasting colours of Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles for maximum effect.

Davallia-by-Isa-Catepillan-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-Issue-28Davallia by Isa Catepillán is an interesting cover up shawl-cum-jacket. This crocheted piece is full of drama. A large tasseled fringe hangs from an elegant lacey body. It reminds me of the dappled light through the trees. It would make a great layer for spring days and cool summer nights. Choose a light yarn with a plant fibre content like the linen blend of Stolen Stitches Nua.

Adiantum-by-Kelly-Ordemann-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-28Vines trace the shape of the yoke in Adiantum by Kelly Ordemann. A playful use of pattern, the plant motif radiates from the neck giving the appearance of a necklace of ferns. With clever shaping, it is also flattering to wear. A plant themed top like this calls to be knit in a plant dyed fibre. Choose Hey Mama Wolf’s Sockyarn #04 in its dreamy natural shades.

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Another crochet offering is Water Clover by Isa Catepillán. A stunningly elegant crochet top with lacey star details. A simple shape made all the better by the pattern repeat. Crocheted in a cotton, linen blend try The Fibre Co Luma which has a soft light papery feel which is perfect for wearing next to your skin. This top will definitely see you into the summer and beyond.

Aurea-by-Stella-Egidi-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-Issue-28This dramatic shawl is the Aurea by Stella Egidi. You cannot get a design that is more close to nature. Leaf and reed motifs sit side by side to create a pattern repeat that is reminiscent of a forest canopy or leafy woodland floor. Knit in a merino single try Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles or a bunch of Black Elephant Minis.

Vivarium-by-Amber-Platzer-Corcoran-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-Issue-28Vivarium by Amber Platzer Corcoran is a fun colour work jumper, with a selection of bold graphic plant motifs. Vivarium takes its name from terrarium structures used for holding plants and means ‘place of life’. This design allows a fun juxtaposition of colour through the botanical elements and with a relaxed drop shoulder fit, it will be the perfect cosy spring evening layer. Colour work projects scream out for Hillesvåg Tinde in a great range of colours you will find the perfect greens!

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Ginkgophyte by Emily Greene is worked flat and seamed, with sleeves worked in the round. With a bold central detail that is repeated on the back and accentuates the simple form. Short sleeves make this the perfect spring garment, for when the days get longer and the promise of summer is just around the corner. Choose the cool and super soft Kettle Yarn Beyul for this, a lovely light yarn perfect for wearing next to your skin.

Woodwardia-by-Lydia-Gluck-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-Issue-28Woodwardia by Lydia Gluck is a top down raglan jumper with a cosy rolled neck and with a lovely vine detail running along the raglan seams. We all know spring weather can be a little unpredictable so this cosy jumper will become a wardrobe staple. Try this in the soft Vivacious DK.

Filix-by-Judith-Brand-Pom-Pom-Quarterly-Issue-28Filix by Judith Brand are stylish crocheted fingerless gloves. A graphic abstracted fern chevron motif runs along the back of the hand. These fingerless gloves are the perfect size for keeping out the evening chill by extending over the wrist. This pattern calls for a silk, merino blend so try Scrumptious 4ply.

I hope these suggestions get you excited and ready to spring into spring. This is a very calm and gentle edition of Pom Pom with subtle details carrying the theme. A collection of interesting but also wearable pieces.

 

New Yarn: Àrd-Thìr by Kate Davies Designs

It’s a pleasure to introduce Àrd-Thìr a new Aran weight yarn by Kate Davies in collaboration with one of our favourite yarn producers Fyberspates. It will not disappoint, such an amazing colour range and feels wonderful.

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Àrd-Thìr means Highlands in Scottish Gaelic and you couldn’t get a better name than that. A combination of 60% Peruvian Highland Wool and 40% Superfine Alpaca, it is produced in the Peruvian Highlands. But it’s colour inspiration comes from the Scottish Highlands. To be more specific the Scottish winter landscape. In 10 shades, Kate Davies says of her colour choice:

‘Our winter landscape is often thought to be drained of colour, but if you look carefully, you’ll discover a mix of many interesting shades: from the deepening russet tones of bracken-covered hillsides to the luminous hues of lichen hanging from bare branches; from the glancing orange glow of sunlight across high rocky peaks to the extraordinarily rich colour of a sealoch under a leaden Februrary sky. Each of the ten shades I’ve designed is a subtle, muted marl; each possesses its own depth and tonal variety; some can be combined into intriguing gradients, and all work together harmoniously as a range.’

This approach to the colours adds a richness and complexity, which would not only be fun to knit, but also produce beautiful knitwear.

Àrd-Thìr is worsted spun aran weight yarn. The combination of fibres make it well rounded, soft and squishy. It feels amazing next to the skin and would be perfect for many garments and accessories. I’m thinking oversized snuggly cabled jumpers or warm textured scarves. It would knit up to make something warm and cosy and would be perfect for textures, cables and colourwork. In 50g (65m/75yd) skeins it is the perfect yarn for when a little bit of a contrast colour or a colour work motif is needed. The possibilities are endless. There is something comforting about having a nice aran weight project on your needles in winter. Quick to knit and satisfying, it makes a change from all those 4ply projects!

Kate Davies has released two patterns for this yarn, so you can drool over them and take some inspiration. One hat and one pullover. This gives you a chance to see how the yarn knits up and maybe start planning that next project.

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The Weel Riggit Pullover is an all over colour work jumper, featuring a simple repeating pattern making the full use of the complimentary tones in Àrd-Thìr. Riggit in Scots and Shetland dialect means “rigged out” or “dressed”. To be “weel riggit” is to be well dressed. What better name can there be for this handsome jumper.

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The Weel Riggit Hat lets you sample the colour combinations of the jumper but in this smaller project. Using 4 skeins in 4 different shades to produce the perfect winter accessory. A fun project for having a play with your favourite colours.

I hope the rich tones in this yarn will help you chase away the winter blues and get knitting something cosy and warm.

Book Review – Knit How From Pompom

We love the pompom quarterly magazine and editors Meghan Fernandes and Lydia Gluck have a great eye for a detail. But have you ever felt intimidated by some of the patterns you see, or stuck just knitting the same scarf over and over and wondering where to go next. Well this is the book for you. Knit How, Simple Knits, tools and tips is the perfect guide for the novice knitter.

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Taking you from the very beginning of knitting you will learn, casting on, the knit and purl stitch and casting off. You then learn through a series of projects, 10 in total, each taking you through a new skill. Starting with the simple, weaving in ends, swatching and blocking.

New stitches are introduced through other projects, like cowls with different stitch patterns. Hat’s cover knitting in the round, cables in a scarf project. Larger projects like jumpers are also included, as well as socks and a little bit of lace. Before you know it you will have the confidence to take on any project.

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Beautifully illustrated throughout with photographs and drawings, taking you step by step in a clear and simple way. You will be introduced to a variety of knitting terminology and charts. This will give you a knitting skill set that you can apply to any pattern you may come across and throughout the book.

Let’s take a look at some of the patterns inside, to whet your appetite at the knitting potential in your hands.

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Ce – Fingerless Mitts. A DK weight simple pair of fingerless mitts to test you newly learned skills. Worked flat and seemed, they are a classic way to keep your hands warm.

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The Mary, Bobby and Juju Cowl’s let you play with texture, learning different pattern repeats to create a different look over this simple accessory.

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The Alice scarf introduces you to cables in a manageably sized project.

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There are even these Chris and James jumpers. A perfect beginners jumper to hone your skills on sizing and shape.

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These Rachel socks are a great way of taking some knitters fears of knitting in the round by making these Simple DK weight bed socks.

So if there are any projects out there you wish you had the skills for, then this book could help you on your way. Also if you are new to knitting or want to inspire a friend to knit, then  this would be the perfect place to start. I predict it will become a go to guide on knitting for years to come.